In my opinion, these are the best of the best of survival and preparedness articles gleaned from the 'net.

Please visit the originating sites to see more like them.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Joke Of The Day

"A guy makes a rolling stop at a stop sign and gets pulled over by a local policeman. Guy hands the officer his driver's license, insurance verification, plus his concealed carry weapon (CCW) permit.


"Okay," the officer says, "I see your CCW permit. Are you carrying today?"

"Yes, I am.

"Well then, you'd better tell me what you've got."

The motorist says, "Well, I got a .357 revolver in my inside coat pocket. There's a 9mm semi-auto in the glove box. And, I've got a .22 Magnum derringer in my right boot."

"Okay," the officer says. "Anything else?"

"Yeah, back in the trunk, there's an AR-15 and a 12 gauge shotgun. That's about it."

"Sir, are you on your way to a gun range?"

"Nope."

"Well then, what are you afraid of?"

"Not a d**ned thing!"

Truth behind expiration/sell by dates

馬口鐵罐頭食品涼粉 Category:Canned food Category:Grass ...
Most of you know this already, but if you have folks, like my wife who thinks an item isn't edible a week before the printed date on the carton, can, or wrapper, here's an article that may help...

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/...n4953898.shtml

The Truth Behind "Sell-By" Dates On Foods
Are They Freshness Deadlines Or Guidelines? Expert's Answers May Surprise You

Prevention magazine's Rebekah George and substitute co-anchor Jeff Glor on The Early Show Saturday Edition. (CBS)

How Long Foods In Fridge Stay Safe To Eat
(CBS) On average, a family of four throws out more than 120 pounds of food each month.

But plenty of perishables have a shelf life long beyond their "sell-by" dates.

So, just how strictly should you adhere to expiration dates?

On The Early Show Saturday Edition, Rebekah George, an editor at Prevention magazine, offered tips on when you really have to toss that food.

MOST THINGS WILL LAST A LOT LONGER, RIGHT? HOW ARE THOSE DATES DETERMINED?

They always leave room for error, because people won't always abide by the sell-by date.

MILK CAN BE SAFELY USED UP TO A WEEK PAST THE SELL-BY DATE?

Yes, it can, if you keep in mind that your fridge has to remain at 40-degrees Fahrenheit, or below, at all times. Make the milk the last thing you pick up before you hit the store's checkout, to minimize the time it's left un-refrigerated, which can exacerbate the spoilage; then, store it at the very back of the shelf, where the air tends to be colder.

EGGS WILL LAST THREE TO FOUR WEEKS PAST THEIR SELL-BY DATE?

You have to refrigerate them to rule out any safety concerns. Be sure to store them in their original container on a refrigerator shelf, rather than on the door, where the eggs will be more vulnerable to fluctuations in temperature because it's constantly opened and closed.

HARD CHEESES WILL LAST THREE TO FOUR MONTHS BEYOND THEIR SELL-BY DATE

They can last a little longer because they contain less moisture than soft cheeses. If you wrap the cheese in moisture-proof plastic or foil, it will last longer. If the outside forms a visible mold, just trim the mold and a 1/2 inch area of the cheese below it.

YOGURT

Yogurt will last 10 days to two weeks beyond the sell-by date, if it's stored at around 39 degrees Fahrenheit, which is right at the appropriate temperature for your fridge. And don't worry if it separates; just stir it up and dig in. The separation is called whey, and that's a good sign, because it shows that the beneficial cultures are alive and working. But toss if it has any visible mold or a bad odor.

LUNCH MEAT WILL STAY GOOD FOR THREE TO FIVE DAYS PAST THE SELL-BY DATE?

Yes, if it's sealed. But be sure to store it in the meat compartment, which is specially designed to keep the cool air in, and it will keep your meat fresher. Packaged meat doesn't start to deteriorate until it's opened. Just eyeball it before you consume it. if it has a yucky, green, slimy film, get rid of it!

IF YOU KEEP SOMETHING IN THE FREEZER, WILL IT STAY EDIBLE FOREVER, OR IS THAT JUST A MYTH?

Not forever, but for a pretty long time, if your freezer is set at zero degrees. But for every five degree increase in temperature, cut the storage time in half. And though foods will stay edible, the texture and flavor will diminish with time. And freezing doesn't kill the bacteria, so remember to cook it thoroughly, and follow the fridge rules when you take out.

HOW LONG CAN RAW MEAT BE KEPT IN THE FREEZER?

Raw poultry and pork, and beef in the form of steaks and roasts, will last up to 12 months. Ground beef will only be good for about three to four months. Cooked meat will last about three to four months, as well.

ICE CREAM?

You can keep ice cream for up to two-to-four months.

FOODS YOU KEEP IN YOUR PANTRY OR CLOSET OFTEN DON'T COME WITH SELL-BY DATES.

But it doesn't mean they'll last forever, and a lot depends on whether they're open or not. For example, oils will last unopened for about six months; opened, for half that time. Ground herbs and spices will last for six months; whole spices, for two years.

WHAT ABOUT THINGS LIKE PASTA, RICE, AND SUGAR?

They'll last for about a year in the closet, then you should think about tossing it.

AND CANNED GOODS?

Canned goods will last, unopened, for between two and five years.
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Survival Kitchen–How Do You Use All That Wheat?

http://destinysurvival.com/2010/09/13/survival-kitchen-how-do-you-use-all-that-wheat/

You’ve stocked up with several buckets of vacuum packed wheat, but you don’t know how in the world you’ll use it all. You know wheat is a basic and necessary grain. The Egyptians made out well with it thousands of years ago, so it should be a great survival food. But how many ways can you prepare it?
This week’s DestinySurvival Amazon Pick of the Week is a paperback book simply entitled How to Live on Wheat, by John W. Hill. It’s described as a cookbook, preparedness, and survival manual, all in a little over 100 pages.
Hill has put together a thorough reference, clearly written with numerous interesting recipes. Topics covered include:
* Food Storage
* Grinding Wheat into Flour
* Where to get Tools and Supplies
* Essene Bread
* Pan Bread
* Fry Bread
* Sprouting
* Sourdough
* Pasta
* Dumplings
* Biscuits and Pancakes
* Pizza Crust
* Baking
* Bread Making
* Improvised Bread Making
* Salads
* Gluten Meat Substitute
* Food Combination
* Cast Iron Cookery
…And more!
Better still, How to Live on Wheat has been updated with a new third edition. The description on Amazon.com says in part:
“This revised and expanded Third (2011) edition provides more information on other grains and legumes and addresses questions, suggestions and critique from readers of the previous edition…It covers the storage of wheat and other grains and legumes, the preparation of all of the basic foods from the whole grain to the finished product in the simplest and most foolproof manner possible.”
The book’s author John W. Hill says, when it comes to food storage, “…wheat is king because of its long term storage qualities, its nutritional value as a fresh food (especially when sprouted) and its superior bread making qualities.” He further says, “While whole grains are relatively inexpensive to acquire and store, many people are not familiar with how to easily and efficiently turn them into food.
“In answering these questions for myself, I compiled the first edition of this book in 1994. In this third edition, I have added a substantial amount of new information and broadened my explanations and descriptions of many of the basic principles and processes of storage and cooking with wheat and other whole grains and legumes.”
If you cook with whole grain wheat, why not get this book? If you’re not already using wheat, get this book and discover the possibilities. For a few dollars, you’ll have an invaluable resource at your fingertips.
To order How to Live on Wheat, click on the image of the book below and add it to your cart on the Amazon.com page where it’s featured.
HOW to LIVE on WHEAT Don’t be intimidated by the prospect of not knowing what to do with all that stored wheat. Discover how to be creative with wheat today and have the survival food edge for tomorrow.


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