In my opinion, these are the best of the best of survival and preparedness articles gleaned from the 'net.

Please visit the originating sites to see more like them.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Murder in the Garden: Organic Pest Control Remedies

There is no doubt that when vegetables are at their peak performance, little critters find them irresistible and begin  chomping away at our beloved plants we have weaned from seed.  Those of us who are gardening organically have two options — 1. grab those suckers and stomp them with your boot. 2. Find a natural spray that will do the dirty work for you.    
www.agoosa.com
 For some who are trying a hand at growing their own food all have found different challenges along the way.  Luckily, thanks to the information age, there is knowledge available from those who are more than willing to share the wealth of knowledge.  Annette McFarlane, an experienced gardener and author of Organic Vegetable Gardening has been kind enough to share some of her secrets to organic gardening.  To help rid the garden of non-beneficial insects (otherwise known as pests), here are a few concoctions that can help remedy gardening problems we find along the way.   
Tree Pastes
Tree pastes are used as an aid to tree vigour and for pest and disease control. Biodynamic gardeners routinely use tree pastes during winter. The original formula proposed by biodynamics founder, Rudolf Steiner, was composed of:
   
 4 parts cow manure (naturally aged, not processed products)
2 parts diatomaceous earth* or silica sand
3 parts fine clay* or bentonite*
    
 My own experiments centre on insecticide grade diatomaceous earth as the primary ingredient. I use pastes to prevent borer attack and control scale infestation on roses and citrus. It should be noted that insecticide grade diatomaceous earth is not the same as the heat treated and highly dangerous diatomaceous earth used in swimming pool filters.   
 *Insecticide grade diatomaceous earth is available in domestic quantities from Green Harvest.  Bentonite can be purchased from most produce stores, but is usually only available in large bags. Potter’s clay is available in small quantities from discount stores and craft suppliers.   
 Black Spot Spray/Bicarb Soda Spray
1 tablespoon of bicarbonate soda
4.5 litres of water
1 tablespoon of homemade Oil Spray concentrate (see below) or commercial oil spray (vegetable oil based)
Spray weekly as a preventative treatment to minimise black spot and mildew.  Improve air circulation around plants.  Avoid wetting the foliage and thin out overcrowded growth. Remove any leaves affected by black spot as soon as they are sighted.
   
 Casuarina Tea
Casuarina trees contain high levels of silica. Biodynamic gardeners make a spray made from casuarina foliage for use against fungal diseases like anthracnose and other mildews.
Simmer 60gm dried Casuarina needles in one litre of water for 20 minutes using a stainless steel container.
Strain and dilute 1 part concentrate to 40 parts water.
Spray in the air around trees early in the morning.
   
 Garlic Spray
Three large cloves of crushed garlic
1 tablespoon of vegetable oil
One teaspoon of liquid soap
One litre of water
Combine the garlic and vegetable oil and leave to soak overnight. Strain and add to the litre of water along with the liquid soap. Spray regularly. Garlic in known for its antifungal and antibacterial properties, but it is its insect repellent qualities that most gardeners admire.
   
 Powdery Mildew Spray/Milk Spray
Powdery mildew appears as grey or white powdery spots on the new foliage.  It causes puckering of the foliage and in severe infestations, a burnt appearance and leaf fall.   This disease occurs most frequently when night temperatures drop and relative humidity remains high.  Avoid the over-use of high nitrogen fertilisers as these can tend to make leave growth that is soft and more susceptible to disease.
1 part of milk
9 parts of water
Spray regularly over the leaves, paying particular attention to soft new growth
   
 Homemade Oil Spray
Mix 500ml of vegetable oil
½ cup of Sunlight dish washing liquid or other pure liquid soap
Blend thoroughly and seal in a clean, clearly labelled jar. Store in a cool area for later use.
Dilute one tablespoon of the concentrate into one litre of water before spraying.
   
Oil based mixtures can be used to suffocate mites, scale and other soft bodied insects. They help to repel leaf miner moths and some gardeners even find them effective against grasshoppers. Avoid using on plants with hairy leaves and during very hot weather.  
Molasses Spray
Dissolve one tablespoon of molasses into a litre of warm water.
Add one teaspoon of Sunlight dish washing liquid or other pure liquid soap
   
 Spray regularly over the leaves of all plants attacked by caterpillars and other chewing pests. Caterpillars would rather starve than eat leaves sprayed with this mixture. It has also been used with success by some gardeners as a possum repellent and for the treatment of soil affected by root knot nematodes by doubling the concentration of molasses.   
 Chili Spray
Small hot chillies (40-50)
2 litres of water
5 grams of pure soap flakes dissolved in hot water or a few drops of liquid soap
Puree the chillies and one litre of water together in a blender. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve and add the soap and the other litre of water. Spray this mixture undiluted on to plants.
   
This spray is a favourite with warm climate gardeners who have chillies in abundance almost year round. If you do not have a chili bush you can substitute chili powder or paste. Chili spray is particularly effective against ants, aphids and other soft-bodied insects.   
 Warning - This mixture can look attractive to children, so be sure to label correctly and store out of their reach. Wear gloves when spraying and ensure that the mixture does not come in contact with your skin or eyes.   
 (This text contains an edited extract from Annette McFarlane’s book, Organic Vegetable Gardening, published by ABC Books). 

Fritos, Potato Chips and Wheat Thins From Your Own Kitchen


Typical brands of Potato Chips at a superstore.
It seems we are getting ATTACKED. If you recieve an email from Totally Ready support please do not open it. All correspondence from Totally Ready must go through me and will have my address. Just one more type of emergency to prepare for, a ciber attack. I guess we will have to address that soon.
You all know how much I believe in food storage. I believe we should store the foods we eat. I believe you need to store foods from each of the food group. I believe we should not be storing dehydrated or freeze dried foods unless you have tried then and and will commit to using them now so you and your famiy become accustomed to them AND you plan to store plenty of extra water. I believe you should learn to cook from scratch including breads, main dishes and treats. I also believe treats are essential, absolutely necessary, to any and all food storage plans. In that spirit here are a few recipes from one of our absolutely terrific friends in our yahoo group…thanks Cherlynn..
  Homemade Wheat Thins

   1 3/4 C  Whole wheat flour
   1 1/2 C White flour
   1/3 C  Oil emulsified in blender with 3/4 tsp salt and 1 cup water

Mix dry ingredients, add oil/water mixture.  Knead as little as possible.
Make smooth dough then roll as thin as possible on cookies sheet
(not more than 1/8 inch). Mark with knife to size of crackers desired, but
do not cut through. Prick each cracker a few times with fork. Sprinkle
lightly with salt or onion salt as desired. Bake at 350 F until crisp and light brown for 30-35 minutes.
Origin: Homemaking Handbooklet, Mormon Church, 1978
Cheese Straw Crackers
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, at room temperature
2 cups shredded sharp Cheddar, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
In a food processor,  add  butter, cheese, flour, salt and cayenne and process until a smooth dough is formed.
 Scoop  into a cookie press, fitted with a flat ridged tip. Pipe  dough in 2-inch strips onto a lightly greased cookie sheet. OR Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes and roll on a lightly floured surface into a 1/4-inch thick rectangle. Cut into smaller rectangles, about 2 by 3-inches, with a pizza wheel or sharp knife.
Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to racks to cool. Works best when pressed in a cookie press!
Homemade Fritos
1/2 cup organic, non-GMO yellow cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon olive oil
1. Preheat oven to 450F degrees.
2. Combine cornmeal and salt in a mixing bowl. Pour in boiling water and stir, add olive oil, and stir until well blended.
3. Drop mixture by heaping teaspoonfuls onto a well-greased baking sheet and press each one with the bottom of a glass. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.
Makes approximately 3 dozen chips.
I hand grind popcorn for my cornmeal.  Popcorn has less starch than regular corn and makes the best cornmeal ever!
Potato Chips
6 or more medium potatoes
Oil or fat for deep frying
Salt or other seasonings

Wash and peel the potatoes. Slice very thin.
An old fashioned cabbage slicer can be used (careful of the fingers) – or use a sharp knife or food processor with a thin slicing blade.
Put the slices at once into a bowl of cold water and let stand for at least one hour. Ice water is best, but you can set the whole bowl in the refrigerator if you wish. Dry well by shaking them in a towel.
Fry in hot oil at 390 degrees F. until a light golden brown. Don’t try frying too many at once, better to put one layer on the frying basket. Drain on paper towels or any kind of plain crumpled absorbent paper. If you haven’t any paper, use a worn dish towel. Salt lightly. These can be kept for some time if they are sealed into plastic bags or containers after they have cooled.
Corn Tortilla Dough
First mix together for about 3 minutes, or until it becomes a dough ball:
2 Cups Maseca Corn Masa mix
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 1/8 Cup Water
(If it is a little crumbly just mix in a Tablespoon of water)
Separate dough into 16 equally sized pieces. Now you will want to form these globes into slightly flat little balls.
Place a floured (use Maseca Corn Masa Flour) plastic bag down on a bread board, put a ball of dough on top, then top this with another floured plastic bag and roll the tortilla out. Now slowly remove the top plastic bag, flip it over in your hand and remove the second plastic bag.
Mess Up?
Now, I don’t know who you are, or where you are, but I know you are out there, and you did not listen when I told you to use the bag! Yes, you have a hopeless mess. Now go back and do it right. You must put a bag (or wax paper) on the press, or the dough will stick to it.
Now, it is time to cook your tortillas. Put the Skillet on a burner that is set at medium heat. Then, quickly flop your tortilla on the skillet. Once you begin to see some bubbles appear, take your spatula and flip it over and let it cook on the other side. Once the other side is a little brown just remove it from the burner, and place it to the side.
HOMEMADE TORTILLA CHIPS
1 pkg. flour/corn tortillas (12 package)
Nonstick cooking spray
1/8 tsp. paprika
1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/8 tsp. chili powder
Spray each tortilla with cooking spray. Sprinkle lightly with spices. Stack tortillas and cut in half, in quarters, in eighths. Single layer on cookie sheet. Bake or broil 5 minutes at 350 degrees. A tasty, low fat, low salt alternative.
  Homemade Wheat Thins

   1 3/4 C  Whole wheat flour
   1 1/2 C White flour
   1/3 C  Oil emulsified in blender with 3/4 tsp salt and 1 cup water

Mix dry ingredients, add oil/water mixture.  Knead as little as possible.
Make smooth dough then roll as thin as possible on cookies sheet (not more than 1/8 inch). Mark with knife to size of crackers desired, but do not cut through. Prick each cracker a few times with fork. Sprinkle
lightly with salt or onion salt as desired. Bake at 350 F until crisp and light brown for 30-35 minutes.
Origin: Homemaking Handbooklet, Mormon Church, 1978
 Cheese Straw Crackers
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, at room temperature
2 cups shredded sharp Cheddar, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
In a food processor,  add  butter, cheese, flour, salt and cayenne and process until a smooth dough is formed.
 Scoop  into a cookie press, fitted with a flat ridged tip. Pipe  dough in 2-inch strips onto a lightly greased cookie sheet. OR Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes and roll on a lightly floured surface into a 1/4-inch thick rectangle. Cut into smaller rectangles, about 2 by 3-inches, with a pizza wheel or sharp knife.
Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to racks to cool. Works best when pressed in a cookie press!
 Homemade Fritos
1/2 cup organic, non-GMO yellow cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup boiling water
1 teaspoon olive oil
1. Preheat oven to 450F degrees.
2. Combine cornmeal and salt in a mixing bowl. Pour in boiling water and stir, add olive oil, and stir until well blended.
3. Drop mixture by heaping teaspoonfuls onto a well-greased baking sheet and press each one with the bottom of a glass. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.
Makes approximately 3 dozen chips. I hand grind popcorn for my cornmeal.  Popcorn has less starch than regular corn and makes the best cornmeal ever!
Potato Chips
6 or more medium potatoes
Oil or fat for deep frying
Salt or other seasonings
Wash and peel the potatoes. Slice very thin.
An old fashioned cabbage slicer can be used (careful of the fingers) – or use a sharp knife or food processor with a thin slicing blade.
Put the slices at once into a bowl of cold water and let stand for at least one hour. Ice water is best, but you can set the whole bowl in the refrigerator if you wish. Dry well by shaking them in a towel.
Fry in hot oil at 390 degrees F. until a light golden brown. Don’t try frying too many at once, better to put one layer on the frying basket. Drain on paper towels or any kind of plain crumpled absorbent paper. If you haven’t any paper, use a worn dish towel. Salt lightly. These can be kept for some time if they are sealed into plastic bags or containers after they have cooled.
Corn Tortilla Dough
First mix together for about 3 minutes, or until it becomes a dough ball:
2 Cups Maseca Corn Masa mix
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 1/8 Cup Water
(If it is a little crumbly just mix in a Tablespoon of water). Separate dough into 16 equally sized pieces. Now you will want to form these globes into slightly flat little balls.
Place a floured (use Maseca Corn Masa Flour) plastic bag down on a bread board, put a ball of dough on top, then top this with another floured plastic bag and roll the tortilla out. Now slowly remove the top plastic bag, flip it over in your hand and remove the second plastic bag.
Mess Up? Now, I don’t know who you are, or where you are, but I know you are out there, and you did not listen when I told you to use the bag! Yes, you have a hopeless mess. Now go back and do it right. You must put a bag (or wax paper) on the press, or the dough will stick to it.
Now, it is time to cook your tortillas. Put the Skillet on a burner that is set at medium heat. Then, quickly flop your tortilla on the skillet. Once you begin to see some bubbles appear, take your spatula and flip it over and let it cook on the other side. Once the other side is a little brown just remove it from the burner, and place it to the side.
HOMEMADE TORTILLA CHIPS
1 pkg. flour/corn tortillas (12 package)
Nonstick cooking spray
1/8 tsp. paprika
1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/8 tsp. chili powder
Spray each tortilla with cooking spray. Sprinkle lightly with spices. Stack tortillas and cut in half, in quarters, in eighths. Single layer on cookie sheet. Bake or broil 5 minutes at 350 degrees. A tasty, low fat, low salt alternative.
There you go. Now it’s your turn, time to go and try one of these treats. Please let us know what you think and how they turned out.
Totally Ready Newsletters July 2009- June 2010
Join Our Yahoo Group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TotallyReady/
Subscribe to our Newsletter: http://blog.totallyready.com/announcing-the-totally-ready-newsletter/
Enhanced by Zemanta

Egads, a wart!

“Most journalists are restless voyeurs who see the warts on the world, the imperfections in people and places. gloom is their game, the spectacle their passion, normality their nemesis.” – Gay Talese, author What’s a wart? A wart is a skin growth caused by a human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts can spread but are not highly contagious. Don't pick at a wart, and wash your hands after touching a wart. Keep hands and feet dry as warts thrive in moist environments.
Common warts come in a variety of shapes and names depending on the infected body part:
* Dome shape warts on backs of hands, feet, and knees
* Plantar warts on the bottom of feet can make standing painful. See a doctor.
* Flat/plane warts on face and legs
* Periungual warts near or under nails
* Filiform warts on stalks on the face
Note: genital warts are different from common warts and caused by a venereal disease. The treatments below do not apply to genital warts and you should see a doctor.
Treatments
Salicylic-acid can be applied in drops, gels, pads and plasters to dissolve the wart (slowly) over weeks or months. The acid also affects skin so apply with care. If the surrounding skin becomes raw take a break from the acid treatment and let the skin recover. For best results file dead skin off the wart and then soften it by soaking in warm water before applying acid.
Freezing – there are over-the-counter aerosols that freeze at -70F and liquid nitrogen used by doctors at a super cold -320F. I once had a toe wart that survived months of acid but died in one application of liquid nitrogen.
Duct tape? – a popular home remedy that might actually work. Apply duct tape to the wart, keep it in place for a week, remove it, soak the wart, and pare it down with a filing (emery) board. Just like Salicylic -acid you’ll repeat this for months and must halt for awhile if the surrounding skin becomes red and soggy.
Surgery – for super stubborn warts a doctor may use a laser or scalpel but this can be painful and leave a scar.
Bottom Line
Sometimes a Wart is not a Wart. It’s a cancer. See a doctor if:
- the wart is anywhere on an infant
- the wart becomes red, swollen, or painful to the touch
- the wart oozes a discharge or bleeds

Web Resourceshttp://www.medicinenet.com/warts_common_warts/article.htm
http://www.drdaveanddee.com/warts.html (on duct tape)
http://www.warts.org/wart-removal.html

Recent Comments

Grab This Widget

Popular Posts