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Saturday, April 10, 2010

Sheltering in Place - The Home Disaster Kit - Part One

Alternate Housing

Sheltering in place is normally your best option if you aren’t forced to evacuate or “bug out”. It may be your only option if you don’t have the opportunity to leave early enough to reach your known destination without becoming stranded. If it comes down to “toughing it out at home” or being stranded on the side of the road, sheltering in place will always be the better choice.
The first step in preparing to shelter in place is making a home disaster kit. While similar in nature to a “bug out” kit, it does have other equally important components. It isn’t difficult and doesn’t need to be very expensive, but it does require some thought on your part and the necessary time to do it correctly. There will be certain costs involved but with careful planning you can develop and utilize multi-use items to help you achieve your goals for sheltering in place.
Deciding to build and keep a home disaster kit will also put you ahead of the game. Many emergency management professionals estimate that only about 10% of the population has undertaken any type of emergency preparedness. Having a home disaster kit will allow you to make yourself more self-sufficient and give you and your family better options and more choices in an emergency or a disaster. You can be doing something positive while others may not even be around and give you a chance to react in a more positive way to a disaster. It will also give you greater peace of mind knowing that you didn’t have to rely on government emergency services to help you restore order to your life. You won’t have to wait days or weeks to restore a little normalcy to your life but can put your plan immediately into action.
Just as you have a “bug out” bag in case you need to evacuate, you should also have a Home Disaster Kit should you decide to shelter in place. Many people are less prepared to “shelter in place” than they are if required to “bug out”. Having a Home Disaster Kit will put you a step ahead.
Sheltering in Place - The Home Disaster Kit - Part Two will cover the contents and basic items needed for a Home Disaster Kit. It will include the different options that are available to help you “shelter in place” safely.
Got Home Disaster Kit?
Staying above the water line!
Riverwalker