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Monday, February 22, 2010

Saving Bucks on your Food Storage

Photo by R L Sheehan of commercially available...
By Joseph Parish
When you finally plan to store up on dehydrated foods it often can prove to be a shocking experience as you scout around the net looking at the various prices. Far too often this assortment of online merchants tends to charge enormous prices for their products which the average consumer most frequently decides to put off purchasing. These preparedness web sites try to sell you these long term items for prices that are unbelievable and really not necessary.
The fancy packaging and number 10 cans are completely unnecessary to ensure your family’s food needs in the event of an emergency situation. You can just as easily prepare many of your own supplies and at a fraction of the cost.
The first thing that you should do it store p on a considerable amount of mason jars with lids and bands for them. You can often find many jars at yard sales or flea markets where a bulk purchase could save you a considerable sum over purchasing the items new at the supermarket or your local Discount store.
Once you have the number of mason jars that you feel would suit your need you can start to fill them with the following items. Be sure that you label them with the item name, the date that you packaged them and any other information that you deem necessary. As an example, I package my own powdered cheese. One of the bits of information that I like to include on my label is the amount to use.
Items you can pick up at the grocery store include:
Baking Powder
Baking Soda
Beans (Various Kinds)
Brown sugar
Cornstarch
Pepper
Rice
Salt both plain and iodized
Sugar
Various Herbs and Spices
Yeast
These items can be sealed in your glass jars and will remain usable for many years after. I personally like to stick and oxygen absorber in each jar when I place the lid on them but it isn’t absolutely necessary.
Many of my supplies that I purchase from the supermarket I obtain in glass containers. I feel safe that these containers will preserve my food purchases for a good amount of time. Such items include:
BBQ Sauce
Condiments such as Ketchup, mustard, relishes and pickles
Flavored cooking extracts such as vanilla, etc
Honey
Salad Dressings
Syrups ranging from Corn Syrup to Maple Syrup used in your morning pancakes
Vinegar both Apple Cider or white
This list could go on endlessly but the bottom line is that you should give a serious review of those things that you eat and then go from there.
Copyright @ 2010 Joseph Parish
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