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Friday, January 15, 2010

Cast iron pan

The care and feeding of Cast Iron Cookware.

Everyone knows that a good seasoned cast iron skillet is a treasured possession, you can fry, saute and bake in them.
There are some steps to take to make sure your cookware is seasoned properly.


1. Wash utensil in hot, soapy water. Use soap this time only.(this is the only time you should use soap) Rinse utensil and dry completely.place in 350` oven for 5 min.

2. Apply a thin, even coating of melted shortening (Crisco, Wesson, etc.; do not use butter or butter flavored shortening, or vegetable oil for seasoning) to the utensil with a soft cloth or paper towel. Apply inside and outside ( If your cookware has a lid, make sure you season it as well.)

3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place utensil on top shelf of oven, upside down. Place aluminum foil on a baking sheet and put on bottom shelf of oven to catch any drippings. Bake in oven for one hour, then turn oven off and let utensil remain in the oven until cool.

4. To clean utensil after use, use boiling water and a plastic scrub bun or brush. Do not use soap, unless you are going to repeat the seasoning process. Do not put in dishwasher.

5. Always wash immediately after use, while still hot.

6. After washing utensil, dry thoroughly, then spray lightly with vegetable oil, (Pam, for example), wipe with a paper towel, and store. Never store utensil with lid on. (Cast iron needs air circulation.)

7. Do not use utensil as a food storage vessel.

8. To remove heavy food or grease build-up, scour with steel wool, SOS pad, etc., then re-season.

9. Deep fry in Dutch ovens at least six times prior to cooking beans of any kind. Re-season utensil after cooking acidic foods, such as beans or tomatoes.

10. Follow these simple steps Cookware can last a few lifetimes.

Seasoning is an on-going process. The more you use your cast iron, the better seasoned it gets.
Well seasoned cookware should have a shiney black surface to it.
Try to avoid using metal utensils in your cookware, to avoid scratching the seasoned nonstick surface.

Also if your pan has alot of crusty build-up on the outside of it, run it through a cycle in a self cleaning oven to burn the scale off, then you can use a wire brush or light sandpaper to clean it up, and make sure you season it a couple of times befor cooking in it.






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