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Monday, November 23, 2009

Survive & Prevent being Carjacked

Carjacking has become one of the top crimes in the country. Learn how experts say you can prevent or survive being carjacked.

Carjacking Facts:

  • The Department of Justice reports that there are about 49,000 per year.
  • Ninety-three percent occur in cities or the suburbs.
  • 92% of carjackings are committed when the victim is alone in their car.
  • 90% of carjackings involved the use of a weapon.
  • Most happen near the victims home or work.

Approaching your Vehicle
When approaching your vehicle awareness is your best weapon.

  • Stay alert – Stay alert to what is going on around you
  • Keep your keys ready when walking out to your car.
  • Look around in your car before getting in
  • Watch out for people who are loitering, asking for direction, looking for money or cigarettes, or handing out fliers.
  • Trust you instincts – If something seems out of place go back to where you came from or quickly get in your vehicle and lock the doors

While Driving
Your best line of defense when you are driving is to make it as hard as possible for criminals to enter your vehicle

  • Keep your doors locked, windows up and sun roofs closed.
  • When coming to a stop leave enough room between you and the vehicle in front to be able to quickly maneuver around the vehicles if trouble should arise
  • Driving in the center lane can make it harder for criminals to box you in, and can give you more avenues to escape.

When reaching your destination:

  • Park in a well lit area near the buildings entrance and around other vehicles.
  • Avoid parking near wooded areas, large vans and trucks, or anything that hides your visibility.
  • Never leave valuables in plain view for anyone to see.
  • Look around before you get out of your vehicle. It may also be a good idea to make a loop around the parking lot to check our the situation before parking.

If someone attempts to jack your car:

  • Never get in the car with the criminal, it’s better to lose the car than to lose your life.
  • If they have a gun… Run. Statistics show that if you run you have somewhere around a 90% chance of being safe. If you get in the vehicle you probably have a 100% chance of something bad happening.
  • If you are forced to drive, one option could be to buckle up and consider crashing your car near a busy intersection and hope for the car jacker to fly into the window. Then get out of the car and run like hell.

DON'T WASTE THAT FOOD....



A few weeks ago I read an article on PLANET GREEN , It suggested some great ideas to prevent food waste.
I've added a few more ideas to their list.


Using Up Vegetables
1. Leftover mashed potatoes from dinner? Make them into patty shapes the next morning and cook them in butter for a pretty good "mock hash brown." Or use them to make cakes, patties, and meatloaf. Use your potato peelings to throw in the garden for another batch of home grown spuds.

2. Don't toss those trimmed ends from onions, carrots, celery, or peppers. Store them in your freezer, and once you have a good amount saved up, add them to a large pot with a few cups of water and make homemade vegetable broth. This is also a great use for cabbage cores and corn cobs.

3. Don't toss broccoli stalks. They can be peeled and sliced, then prepared just like broccoli florets, or use them diced small in patties

4. If you have to dice part of an onion or pepper for a recipe, don't waste the rest of it. Chop it up and store it in the freezer for the next time you need diced onion or peppers.

5. Roasted root vegetable leftovers can be turned into an easy, simple soup the next day. Add the veggies to a blender, along with enough broth or water to thin them enough to blend. Heat and enjoy. Or puree them and use them in meatloaf or patties

6. If you're preparing squash, don't toss the seeds. Rinse and roast them in the oven, just like you would with pumpkin seeds. The taste is pretty much the same.

7. Celery leaves usually get tossed. There's a lot of good flavour in them; chop them up and add them to meatloaf, soups, or stews.

8. Use up tomatoes before they go bad by drying them.. You can then store them in olive oil or in the freezer. Puree them and use them as a sauce, instead of water in a casserole or stew

9. Canning is always a good option. If you're doing tomatoes, you can use a boiling water bath. If you're canning any other type of veggie, a pressure canner is necessary for food safety.

10. Before it goes bad, blanch it and toss it in the freezer. This works for peas, beans, corn, carrots, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and leafy greens like spinach and kale, now you have ready prepped veggies for that soup, stew, casserole, side dish

11. Too many zucchini? Make zucchini bread, quiche, pie or muffins. If you don't want to eat the bread now, bake it and freeze it, then defrost when you're ready to eat it.

12.Pickle it. Cucumbers are the first veggie most of us think of pickling, but in reality, just about any vegetable can be preserved through pickling.

Ideas for Cutting Down on Fruit Waste
13. Make smoothies with fruit before it goes bad. Berries, bananas, and melons are great candidates for this use-up idea. Or puree, freeze and use for cake making

14. Jam is really easy to make, and will keep for up to a year if you process the jars in a hot water bath. If you don't do the water processing part, you can keep the jam in the refrigerator for a month, which is a lot longer than the fruits would have lasted.

15. Dry your fruit and store it in airtight containers.

16. Make fruit leather.

17. Make a big fruit salad or "fruit kebabs" for your kids. For some reason, they seem to eat more fruit if it's in these "fancier" forms.

18. Use up the fall bounty of apples by making applesauce or apple butter.

19. Don't throw out those watermelon rinds! Pickled watermelon rind is a pretty tasty treat.

20. Make a fruit crumble out of almost any fruit you have on hand. Assemble and bake it now, or leave it unbaked and store it in the freezer for a quick dessert.

Putting Extra Grains to Good Use

21. Make croutons out of day-old bread.

22. Turn day-old bread into homemade bread crumbs or a bread and butter pudding

23. Freeze leftover bread. This way you'll have day-old on hand whenever you need bread crumbs, or croutons rather than using fresh bread.

24. All of those little broken pieces of pasta in the bottom of the box? Collect them and mix with rice and veggies for a simple side dish.

25. A few tablespoons of leftover oatmeal aren’t enough for a meal, but it is great sprinkled on top of yogurt. Or use it as a filler in your meatloaf

26. Add chopped bread to a soup. It will dissolve and thicken the soup.

27. Made too many pancakes for breakfast? Put them in the freezer, and then toss in the toaster for a fast, tasty weekday breakfast. Ditto waffles.

28. If you make plain white or brown rice with dinner, use leftovers for breakfast the next morning by adding them to oatmeal. This provides extra fibre and allows you to use up that rice. Make a soup and add the rice, patties, stew or a flaoured rice pudding

29. If you or your kids don't like the bread crusts on your sandwiches, save these bits and pieces in the freezer to turn into bread crumbs later. Just throw the crusts into a food processor or coffee grinder to make them into crumbs. Season as you like.

30. If you have just a smidge of baby cereal left in the box, and it's not enough for a full meal, add it to your baby’s pureed fruit. It adds bulk and fibre, and keeps baby full longer.


Make the Most of Meat

31. Don't toss those chicken bones after you eat the chicken. Boil them to make chicken stock.

32. Ditto for bones from beef and pork.

33. The fat you trim from beef can be melted down and turned into suet for backyard birds.

34. Turn leftover bits of cooked chicken into chicken salad for sandwiches the next day, or freeze and use later for a soup or stew

35. Use leftover roast beef or pot roast in an easy vegetable beef soup the next day by adding veggies, water, and the cooking juices from the meat.


Use Dairy before It Expires

36. If you've got a few chunks of different types of cheese sitting around after a party, make macaroni and cheese.

37. Eggs can be frozen. Break them, mix the yolks and whites together, and pour into an ice cube tray. Two frozen egg cubes is the equivalent of one large egg. Or pickle them for a delightful snack

38. You can also freeze milk. Leave enough room in the container for expansion, and defrost in the refrigerator.

39. Use cream cheese in mashed potatoes or white sauces to give them thickness and tang.

40. Put Parmesan cheese into the food processor with day-old bread to make Parmesan bread crumbs. This is excellent as a coating for eggplant slices, pork, or chicken.


Herbs and How to Get the Most Out of Them

41. Chop herbs and add them to ice cube trays with just a little water. Drop whole cubes into the pan when a recipe calls for that type of herb.

42. You can also freeze herbs by placing them in plastic containers. Certain herbs, such as basil, will turn black, but the flavour will still be great.

43. Make pesto with extra basil or parsley.

44. Dry herbs by hanging them by their stems in a cool, dry location. Once they're dry, remove them from the stems and store them in airtight containers.


Don't Waste a Drop

45. Leftover coffee in the carafe? Freeze it in ice cube trays. Use the cubes for iced coffee or to cool down too-hot coffee without diluting it. You can do the same with leftover tea.

46. If there's a splash or two of wine left in the bottle, use it to de-glaze pans to add flavour to whatever you're cooking.

47. If you have pickle juice left in a jar, don't pour it down the drain. Use it to make a fresh batch of refrigerator pickles, or add it to salad dressings (or dirty martinis).

48. You can also freeze broth or stock in ice cube trays, and use a cube or two whenever you make a pan sauce or gravy.

49. If there's just a bit of honey left in the bottom of the jar, add a squeeze or two of lemon juice and swish it around. The lemon juice will loosen up the honey, and you have the perfect addition to a cup of tea.

Finally....

50. If you can't think of any way to use that food in the kitchen, compost it. Everything except for meat and dairy will work in a compost pile, and at least your extra food can be used for something useful. Throw your meat and dairy to your chooks.