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Sunday, March 22, 2009

Excellent Free Medical Book for Download

The Hesperian Society offers a complete book, entitled Where There is No Doctor, for free download. It is a thorough, widely-used health care manual that would prove a priceless resource in a disaster scenario. The 512-page book is also available for purchase on the site for $22.00.

http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download_wtnd.php


Original: http://allaboutfoodstorage.com/archives/125

USES OF DRY JERKY

HERE ARE SOME RESIPE'S FOR JERKY.----


CABBAGE ROLL'S
  • 8 MED STRIPS OF JERKY placed in water for 5 min
  • 1 CUP ONION cut in to 1/4's
  • 3 CELREY STALK'S cut in to chunk's
  • GARLIC POWDER 1/4 tsp
  • ONION POWDER 1/4 tsp
  • SALT to taste
  • PEPPER to taste
  • 1 MED TOMATO cored
  • 1 MED BELLPEPPER cleaned and seed's removed
  • 1 SMALL CAN CORN drained

PLACE ALL INGREDENT'S IN FOOD BLENDER BLEND TO A CHUNKY MIX NOT A PATAI.

ADD 3 tbl SPOONS OLIVE OIL.

YOU WILL NEED 8 CABBAGE LEAVES BRUSHED WITH OLIVE OIL.

DEVIDE BLENDED MIXTURE IN TO 8 PARTS AND PLACE ON THE 8 CABBAGE LEAVES.

ROLL CABBAGE LEAVE'S TO FORM ROLE'S PRE HEAT SKILLET WITH OLIVE OIL .PLACE ROLE'S IN SKILLET TILL BROWN AND GOLDEN. SERVE HOT WITH RANCH DRESSING SERVES 4.

NEXT IS A GOOD WINTER DISH GREAT WHEN OUT HUNTING OR SURVIVAL IDEA. ( I HOPE YOU DRYED SOME OTHER VEGGIES.)

WINTER STEW

2 SLICES JERKY . ONE 1/4cup POTATO'S --SOME DRYED ONION--GARLIC POWDER--SALT --CORN--PEA'S -1 BOLION CUBE . PLACE ALL INGREDENCE IN YOU MESS KIT POT TEAR JERKY IN TO BIT'S ADD JUST ENOUGH WATER TO COVER LET SOAK FOR 5 MIN. PLACE ON HEAT COOK 10 MIN OR UNTEL HOT KEEP ON LOW HEAT ADDING WATER TO KEEP FROM DRYING OUT SERVE WITH STICK BREAD (SERVES 1)

STICK BREAD IS EASY TO MAKE I START WITH ANY BISKET MIX AND PLACE IN A ZIP LOCK BAG . WHEN NEEDED I MIX 1/2 cup MIX WITH WATER TO FORM A THICK DOUGH . FORM IN TO LOG /LOAF RUN A DEBARKED STICK THROUGH CENTER PLACE NEAR HEAT(FIRE) TILL FLUFFY AND BROWN . SERVE HOT....

FIELD BREAD

THIS BREAD IS MADE IN THE MORNING AND EATEN THROUGH OUT THE DAY.

IN A BOWL YOU WILL MIX 2 STRIPS JERKY (SHREDED) RAISONS, DRYED FRUIT.NUTS,1 tsp SUGER AND PANCAKE MIX . ADD WATER AS NEEDED .COOK CAKES IN OLIVE OIL PLACE ASIDE TO COOL WHEN COOL PLACE IN ZIPLOC BAG .ENJOY THROUGH OUT THE DAY AS A LITTLE PICKME UP.



Original: http://missouripreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/uses-of-dry-jerky.html

ESCAPE AND EVASION

WITH THE GROWING CONCERN OF MARTIAL LAW I HAVE LISTED THIS POST. I HAVE INFORMAL MILATRY TRAINING (UNCLE WAS A NAVY AVERITOR) AND 3 YEARS EXPERINCE IN WILDERNESS SURVIVAL NEVER PLACED LESS THAN 3RD. SO I WILL COVER ESCAPE AND EVASION IN THIS POST . WARNING GRAPHIC MATERIAL IS LISTED HERE----NOTE- I WILL USE THE TERM E&E FOR THE TERM ESCAPE AND EVISION.



E&E IS PROVIDED TO OUR SPECIAL FORCES AND PILOTS . BUT NEVER WAS IT EVEN TALKED ABOUT IN PUBLIC CIRCLES. MANY OF YOU WILL INVISION MEN CHASEING YOU THROUGH THE PRETTY WOOD AND YOU SLIP THROUGH UNSCAVED AND HAPPY. BUT IN TRUTH MANY OF YOU LIVE IN CITY'S WERE YOU ARE COMFORTABLE AND SECURE .SO WHEN TALKING ABOUT E&E WE MUST INCLUDE BOTH SUBUBAN AND URBAN PRACTICE'S. I HAVE INCLUDED HOW TO BECOME INVISABLE IN PLAIN SIGHT. SO FIRST WBoldE WILL COVER SUBURBAN E&E--



THIS IS BOTH THE EASYEST AND HARDEST TO PREFECT . THERE IS A FINE BALLANCE OF BOTH COURAGE AND LUCK .NEVER TAKE ETHER FOR GRANTED NEVER LET DOWN YOUR GAURD. COFFEE WITH HERMIT SAID IT BEST WHEN HE SAID ( LOOK NEATHER LIKE PREDATOR OR PREY ) THIS IS ALSO NEVER LOOK LIKE YOUR OUT OF PLACE. IE; A THREE PEICE SUIT WOULD BE OUT OF PLACE IN THE SOUP KITCHEN LINE. YOU WANT TO GO UNNOTICED AND TODO SO YOU WANT TO BE SEEN BUT NOT REMEMBERD NOT WORTH A SECOND THOUGHT. THIS BRINGS IN TO HUMAN NATURE JUST SOME THING ELCE TO KNOW . IT'S HUMAN NATURE TO REMBER SOMEONE WHO HAS MADE EYE CONTACT . IT'S HUMAN NATURE TO REMEMBER SOMETHING OUT OF PLACE IF NOT IMMIDITLY LATE ON IN THE DAY. THE SAFEST WAY TO HIDE IN A SUBUBAN ENVIROMENT IS IN PLAIN SIGHT. YOU CAN GO UNNOTICED BY FOLLOWING A FEW SIMPLE RULE'S--


  • AVOID PEOPLE YOU KNOW

  • DRESS CLEAN AND NEAT(WHEN IN THE PUBLIC PLACES)

  • AVOID PLACES YOU WOULD NORMALY HANG OUT(NOT JUST PLACES YOU WOULD NORMALY GO BUT PLACES JUST LIKE IT)

  • AVOID UNDER OR OVER DRESSING

  • THE MORE PEOPLE THE BETTER

  • DON'T DRY UNDUE ATTION TO YOURSELF

  • DONT CARRY LARGE BAG'S(SMALL OR MED DAYPACK IS OK)

  • A COLLAGE TOWN IS BEST

  • DONT DRINK (BOOZE DRAWS ATTION AND DULES THE SENCES)

  • IF THE CITY HAS A LARGE HOMELESS POPULATION BECOME PART OF IT(THEY ARE GENRALY ANTI GOVERMENT AND ANTI LAW )

  • WHILE IN ROME DO AS THE ROMINS DUE

  • TELL NO ONE YOUR REAL NAME

  • MAKE MONEY AS A DAY LABOR

  • DO ALL YOU HAVE TO DO DURING DAY LIGHT HOURS( BEING OUT AT NITE DRAWS ATTION FROM THE LOCAL BUSYBODY'S AND LAWENFORCEMENT

THE ABOVE IS JUST AN OUT LINE YOU ARE REQUIRED TO USE YOUR OWN COMMON SENCE.HIDE YOUR LONG GUNS KEEP ONLY A SMALL PISTOL AND GOOD FIXED BLADE KNIFE. IF BY CHANCE YOU HAVE TO USE FORCE DO NOT MOVE THE BODY GET OUT OF SIGHT AND TOWN. JUST WALK AWAY STAY ON THE FRINGE OF SOCITY AND IN THE BACKS OF PEOPLES MINDS.REMEMBER THE KEY IS TO BE SEEN BUT NOT SEEN OR REMEMBERD.


I WILL NOW COVER THE HARDER PART OF E&E URBAN OR WILDERNESS . THERE ARE SO MANY VARRIBLES IN THIS FORM OF E&E THERE IS NO FAST HARD PLANS YOU CAN FORM.THE BIGGEST VARRIBLE IS STAY ANIMALS AND DISPLACED PEOPLE THERE ARE SOMANY THINGS THAT CAN GIVE YOU AWAY. SO TO REDUCE THE RISK THERE IS ONE RULE . IF YOU BREAK THIS RULE YOU WILL BE CAUGHT PERIOD.


THE NUMBER ONE RULE IS TWO PART'S PART ONE IS MOVE SLOW PART TWO IS NEVER EVER PANIC IF YOU BREAK THIS RULE YOUR DONE. YOU MUST BE FLEXABLE IN BOTH MINDSET AND PLANNING. I KNOW SOME OF YOU THINK I'M PREACHY BUT I CAN'T HELP WHO I AM. I JUST WANT YOU TO SURVIVE. SO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED GET CAUGHT. SO ON WE GO.

  • NEVER RUN (JUST MAKES YOU TIRED AND EASEYER TO SPOT)
  • STAY TO COVER( FENCE LINES ARE OK BUT STAY OUT OF OPEN FEILDS AND PFF RIDGE LINES)
  • AVOID BRITE CLOTHING
  • START LATE STOP EARLY (8AM-3PM OTHER TIMES ARE WHEN THEY EXPECT YOU TO MOVE UNLESS YOU MUST CROSS AN OPEN FIELD DO IT AFTER DARK WITH NO MOONLITE)
  • MAKE A COLD CAMP ( COLD CAMP IS WERE YOU EAT EARLY THEN MOVE A COUPLE MILES AND BED DOWN)
  • KEEP HYDEEATED
  • IF THEY ARE CLOSEING IN ON YOU STOP AND HUNKER DOWN(THE HUMAN EYE IS DRAWN TO MOVEMENT IF YOU HOLD STILL THEY WILL PROBLY WALK RIGHT BY YOU)
  • WITH THE ADVENT OF FLER YOU HEAT SIGNURE NEEDS TO BE AT A MIN (PLACE A SPACE BLANKET BETWEEN YOU PONCHO ANS LINER)
  • AVOID PEOPLE
  • AVOID DOMESTIC ANIMALS
  • KILL FARM ANIMALS ONLY AS LAST RESORT(FARMER MIGHT REPORT IT)
  • LEARN HOW TO LEAVE A ZERO ECO FOOT PRINT( ONE STRAY GUM WRAPPER CAN GET YOU CAUGHT.ONE UNCOVERD FIRE PIT BUSTED)
  • BURRY ALL HUMAN WASTE
  • A MIXTURE OF BLACK AND CYANNE PEPPER SPRINKELD ON YOU TRAIL WILL DESTROY A TRACKING DOG'S NOSE (DIBI'S/SHEPERD'S AND ROT'S ARE ALL SIGHT TRACKER'S
  • IF ATTICED BY A DOG NO NOT RUN STAND YOUR GROUND!!!! AS THE DOG ATTACKS STICK YOUR HAND DOWN IT'S THROUT AND GRAB IT'S TOUNG AT THE BACK OF MOUTH(HE CAN'T BITE OR BARK INSERT YOUR KNIFE IN TO IT'S EYE OR CUT IT'S NECK.
  • DONT GIVE UP THERE'S ALWAY'S A CHANCE
  • IN THE EVENT YOU ARE CAUGHT DO NOT SURRENDER IF THEY HAVE PURSUED YOU MORE THAN TWO DAY'S YOUR NUMBER IS UP.(THE ROAD TO HELL IS LONG AND IT'S BEST TO HAVE A TRAVEL BUDDY.
  • THE LAST LINE IS JUST WHAT I WOULD DO . I WAS NOT MADE FOR A PRISON CAMP OR BEATINGS I WILL NOT GO PEACFULY . SO IT'S UP TO YOU IF THEY PUSUED YOU FOR DAY'S YOUR NUMBER IS UP ANY HOW WHY MAKE IT EASY FOR THE SWINE.IN THE END IT'S YOU AND GOD I CAN NOT MAKE A CHOISE FOR YOU

I'M SORRY I COULD NOTE MAKE IT ROSES AND SUNSHINE BUT IF IT COMES TO THE POINT WERE YOU NEED WHAT I HAVE WRITTEN ALL BET'S ARE OFF.E&E IS A GAME OF CAT AND MOUSE AND SOMETIMES THE CAT WIN'S----MADDOG---

Original: http://missouripreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/03/escape-and-evasion.html

Container Gardening

Almost every edible crop that is grown in a traditional garden plot can be successfully raised in a container. Even if you have limited space, or room for just one or two pots on your balcony, you can harvest fresh vegetables, fruits, herbs and edible flowers.

Here is a sampling of the things I have grown in containers in western Massachusetts for the last 19 years:

Tomatoes
Green Beans
Snap peas
Squash
Kale
Spinach
Swiss chard
Peppers
Cucumbers
Radishes
Lettuce
Basil
Strawberries

Even though many people, including myself, have a “regular” garden, there are many advantages to container growing. There is virtually no weeding, and soil in containers is resistant to soil-borne diseases and pests such as slugs. Pots can be easily moved around or brought indoors at the threat of frost. Perennial plants such as dwarf fruit trees can be brought inside for the winter. The same pot can be used for succession planting throughout the growing season- snap peas or Asian greens such as bok choy in the spring, tomatoes in the summer, and kale in the fall.

Some of the things to consider for container gardening- you must be vigilant about watering, especially when the plant root systems get bigger and the weather is hot. This can mean daily watering. There are water-holding crystals such as Soil-Moist that can be mixed into the soil, and then absorb water and gradually release it as needed. You must also be careful of over-fertilizing. Crops that produce large sprawling vines, such as pumpkins and watermelons, are not generally suitable for containers, although some smaller varieties might be available. Many seed companies offer seed varieties specifically bred for smaller spaces such as container growing.

To get started, evaluate the space you currently have, and approximately how much sun that spot will get during the summer growing season. As a general rule, plants such as peppers or tomatoes will require 6 hours of sunlight. Decide what you and your family want to eat, and grow what you like. It is fun to experiment with different varieties, and it is very easy to try 3 or 4 types of tomatoes in individual pots to see which ones you like best.


Below are a couple of websites with more information, and also a great book on growing vegetables in containers.

Websites:
http://www.revivevictorygarden.org/containers.html
http://www.vegetablegardeningguru.com/containers.html



The Bountiful Container (book)
http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=B766

Original: http://massachusettspreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/container-gardening.html

Canning Resources

Some good resources for anyone starting out with canning:


30 pages of the basics of canning from the USDA-
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/usda/utah_can_guide_01.pdf


Great information. The Preserving Food at Home Self-Study course is really good. It allows you to work through the 4 modules at your own pace, and is free.
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/index.html


A forum/message board for any questions and sharing information:
http://www.freshpreserving.com/phpbb/phpBB3/index.php?sid=455f1ba3395264bc2d7810202801fda0


Granny Miller's blog- she has made quite a few videos about canning, which can be accessed from her site:
http://grannymillerblog.blogspot.com/


Canning supplies such as water-bath canners, jars, kids, mixes, etc:
http://canningusa.com/shop.php


Canning and freezing information with illustrations:
http://www.pickyourown.org/allaboutcanning.htm


And some of my favorite canning and preserving books:

http://www.amazon.com/BALL-Complete-Book-Home-Preserving/dp/0778801314/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235309718&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Putting-Food-Plume-Janet-Greene/dp/0452268990/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235309718&sr=1-5

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-Small-Batch-Preserving-Year-Round/dp/1554072565/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235309718&sr=1-7

http://www.amazon.com/Persons-Guide-Preserving-Step-Step/dp/0882669001/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1235309718&sr=1-9

Original: http://massachusettspreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/canning-resources.html

Garden Talk

As garden time nears, I'd like to suggest some things to you all.
A garden is not only a family friendly hobby, it increases your property value and is something very healthy for you to do. It produces yummy bounty for you and also many wonderful and cherished gifts for family and friends. However, as a prepper, the garden takes on a whole new meaning.
Unbelievably, not everyone can garden nor do they want to...if you are one of those, please just ignore this!

As preppers, many of us garden for our actual stockpile of food. Some freeze, some can, some do both. The point is, that if possible, your garden should significantly contribute to your food year round. When my kids were little, I never bought a single veggie, either fresh, canned or frozen. Nor did I have to get fruit. It made it possible to raise a family of 5 on less than $17,000 thousand a year when the average family in the area made $35,000 or more. It also meant that I never ran out of food!
I taught a 4-H garden program and one of the things that I found was that many people thought that gardens equaled nothing but hard work and no fun. I worked hard to find ideas and tricks that would help with this porblem and I'll share some of them with all of you now.

Rule #1 - set your garden goals. Half the fun of gardening is in planning. And, the devil is in the details! How many cans of green beans does your family eat? How many packets of seed will you need to make that many? Plan your garden for the things you need and want and in the amounts that it will do the most good for you and your family. If you can't have a garden that big (and it doesn't take as much space as you think!), then pick a few veggies that you can grow a lot of and make something out of them that will last all year long...many people like beets (I'm not one of them!) and they not only freeze or can them and the greens, but they also pickle the beets. So, for very little space, they can have a years worth of beets in all it's many glorious forms.

Rule #2- work smarter, not harder! A garden that is not taken care of won't give you the maximum result...but that does not mean that it has to be back breaking labor every day and all through the season. In fact, it doesn't mean back breaking labor at all! I am not so young any more and have gotten quite lazy about where I put in extreem effort. So, I plan around my limitations....ball season, work, vacations all get in the way of your garden. So, plant in a different way. Think outside the box....I plant in raised beds. This helps with weeds and digging. It's an ideal way for people with limited space too. I only need to rototill once with a raised bed, as the dirt is never compacted by walking on it. The weeds always get shaded by the veggies after a while. I can grow a years worth of green beans for eating twice a week and for pickling and gift giving in a bed that is 4'x16'.
If you can't build a raised bed, wide rows that are mounded up will work. If you can't have a traditional garden space, grow in tires, planters, or any container. Try one of those "topsy turvy" upside down planters.
I never water my garden after the plants are up, unless there is an extreem draught (once in 12 years). I will explain in rule #3 about this.

Rule #3 - ALWAYS have an experiment going in the garden. This helps you learn more, provides for fun and discussion and keeps the boredom away.
I learned how to virtually eliminate watering by experimenting in the garden. I went to our local school and collected large cans...I think they are #10. I punched holes in the bottom and about 3/4 of the way up the sides. I sunk them into the ground between plants. Then I put a small scoop of compost in the bottom and filled them with water. Rain water did the rest of the watering. It provided my plants with a slow release of fertilizer (compost) and a drip irrigation system. One other thing that it does (talking about experiments) is that I had read that having metal in the garden improved the growth of many plants after a lightening storm. The kids would measure the plants and then after a storm, measure again...most plants were affected by having metal near them, as opposed to not.
Different planting aids can help...trellises, of all different kinds can help you grow up, not out in the garden. You can even grow melons on a trellis! The fun parts/experiment comes in when the fruit is getting bigger. You will need to make little "hammocks" for the fruit out of something like panty hose.

So- the rules are: Plan well, Work smarter, not harder, and make your garden fun!
I'm only an emial away if you have any questions about gardening.


Original: http://massachusettspreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/02/garden-talk.html

Early Spring Foraging


Two days ago it was a lovely day--sun shining, warm with just a hint of crispy chill in the air. I headed down to the garden to see what might be coming up. A lot of the weeds I look for grow in disturbed areas--such as our big garden plot. It needs to be plowed again to get it ready for planting in May, but right now it is covered with dead weeds and the old vines and stalks of last summer's tomatoes and corn.

I found wild onions all over the place--in the garden, on various hillsides, back in the woods; this valley is full of them. I harvested a big bag of them. This takes some digging down to loosen all the roots, then brushing off as much dirt from them as possible. I found yellow dock growing too, although it doesn't have that lovely sour citrusy flavor just yet. I dug up the complete plants and got both the leaves and the roots. I want to make more yellow dock root tincture, which is very good for the liver.

Wintercress (barbaria vulgaris) was also present. This is a member of the mustard family and it is an early spring green. Down south it is avidly harvested and eaten as "creasy greens." That's a wintercress leaf you see at the top of this blog. The leaves are a dark, glossy green. It grows in a basal rosette and later it will send up a center stalk to flower, a pretty yellow flower. When you see a field simply glowing with yellow a little later in the spring, that's probably wintercress. It's a bitter green, but this early, it isn't too bitter. I got a big bag of these as well. Free food! And very nutritious food as well. There's a good description of wintercress at Prodigal Gardens, in the Herbwalk section for March.

Here's a bit more info on wintercress from Mother Earth News:

Winter cress—a mustard—is rich in vitamins and has a slightly peppery flavor that goes well in mixed salads. The young winter leaves are also excellent shredded, flavored with chopped green onion, vinegar, salt, and sugar, and topped with minced bacon (drippings and all). Later in spring the greens take on a bitterness which can be removed by boiling in two waters. When the bloom develops, the leaves become too bitter to eat . . . but the buds can be cooked briefly—no more than 5 minutes overall—in two waters and served like the broccoli they resemble. Lemon butter and Hollandaise sauce are good additions to this wild vegetable.

I plan on harvesting more of the wintercress while it is in it's not to bitter stage. In a few weeks, it will be too bitter even for me. When I got home, I rinsed the wintercress three times in a big pot of water, then cooked it only in the water that remained on this leaves, thus steaming it more or less. I greatly enjoyed mine, but Michael didn't care for it as much. He loves lambsquarters, as do I, but not all greens are a delicious as lambsquarters. I'll eat it and use it in casseroles and slip a few raw leaves into salads.

I also harvested a few early dandelions, roots, leaves and all. Dandelions are not bitter at this stage, in early spring before they flowers. So it is a great time to get all that you can find as dandelions are very nutritious. Here's what Wildman Steve Brill has to say about dandelion leaves:

The leaves are more nutritious than anything you can buy. They're higher in beta carotene than carrots. The iron and calcium content is phenomenal, greater than spinach. You also get vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B12, C, E, P, and D, biotin, inositol, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc by using a tasty, free vegetable that grows on virutally every lawn. The root contains the sugar inulin, plus many medicinal substances.

And here's what Euell Gibbons, master forager, has to say:

"Ridiculous as it sounds, we might be better off nutritionally if we threw away the crops that we so laboriously raise in our fields and gardens and ate the weeds that grow with no encouragement from us—indeed they grow despite all our strenuous efforts to eradicate them.”

“We spend millions on herbicides to kill the dandelions in our lawns, while we pay millions more for diet supplements to give ourselves the vitamins and minerals that dandelion could easily furnish.” Euell Gibbons in his essay on Just How Good Are Wild Foods?

So we ate the wintercress for dinner that night. The next day I put all the wild onions, curly dock leaves and dandelions in a big pot of water, added some dried cayenne peppers and lots of chopped garlic, and simmered it for an hour or so. This makes a wonderful spring tonic broth. Oh, I did add an organic, vegetarian boullion cube for a bit more flavor. This broth I will either use as a soup base, or I'll just drink it warm or cold. I'll give some to a couple of older folks here who could probably use some extra rich nutrition that the broth will supply.

It is still too early here for many of the plants I love, such as plantain. But it'll be coming up soon. I'm planning on harvesting as much wild food as I can--it'll help our food budget, and we'll get a nutritional boost as well. You can't beat that!
HM


Original: http://handmaidenkitchen.blogspot.com/2009/03/early-spring-foraging.html

Week Two - Shelter


Quickstart:

Buy a small family-sized tent, a wool blanket for everyone in the family, and store these item in a place where they can be gotten to if the house collapses or is destroyed.

Blog Post:

Welcome,
Shelter protects us from the elements, but in emergency preparedness, shelter must provide protection from so much more.

Now take out your threat analysis list. Read through it. Anybody have hurricanes or tornadoes on their list? How about wind storms? Terrorism? Wildfire? Now, how do you protect yourself from these hazards? You do research.

FEMA, the United States of America's Federal Emergency Management Agency has many resources for learning about the various natural and technical disasters that will confront you. They even have suggestions on how to mitigate (reduce the effects) hazards such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and terrorism. Check them out; they even have a kids page.

You are going to learn a lot from the FEMA site, but there is more to shelter then what FEMA has on its website.

Suppose, you have to leave your home, or you are stranded in the wilds. If you are stranded, you might have to improvise a shelter. Do you have a tarp? How about some string? Read M4040's tarp shelter page for some how-to on tarp shelters.

If you don't have these items, you can build a dugout shelter or a debris shelter. Out in winter's cold, you might need to build a snow shelter. Outdoor Action has a "Guide to Snow Shelters." Another article about snow trenches can be found in the links section.

If you need something more permanent, you could build a log cabin. Mother Earth News has an article about a $100 cabin. Watch out for inflation, the article was written in 1981.

I know, I know. We will never need these shelters because you don't go into the woods, but just in case, read the links. But what happens if you home is damaged.

You need to keep a few blue tarps on hand to cover any holes in the roof. A few sheets of plywood, and double-headed nails, to protect windows. A roll of clear plastic to cover broken windows also helps. Don't forget the hammer, staples, and the staple gun. The craftsman stapler called the "Easy Fire" seems to be better than the older model of staplers.

Having clear plastic also allows you to form a safe room from a chemical spill or attack. During Gulf War One, the Israelis showed us how to make a safe room for chemical attacks by using the highest room in our homes. The one with no exterior opening such as windows or doors. Don't forget skylights. For most people, this is a hallway bathroom.

If you plan to have a safe room from chemical attack, you can pre-cut the plastic sheeting to cover all of the openings in the room. Doors, windows, and heating vents. You don't have to cover the faucets in the bathroom. Once you cut the plastic, all you need is duct tape to tape the plastic around the opening, and seal.

If you don't pre-cut the plastic sheeting, you will need scissors. A small supply of towels or rags to help seal under the door will also help to stop or slow down the chemicals from entering your chemical attack safe room.

If you shelter in a bathroom, you could use the water and the toilet during your brief stay. A radio for information and card games, coloring books, or other low-activity games to help keep the children occupied are also important.

If possible, pre-position all of these supplies in the room you will use as a safe room.

Remember those opinions, the CDC has a recommendation for using a master bedroom as your shelter in place for a chemical emergency. If you have some kids and a few pets, it sounds like a good idea. Plus, there is more air to breath.

RAND has a a report on some scenarios that might happen during a biological, chemical and radiological attack. Download the PDF. Save it. Read it. Think about the report then act.

With more countries building nuclear weapons and having the means to launch these weapons, the possibility of a nuclear attack increases. I'm talking about the "big one." The 10 to 100 nuclear weapons coming in from Russia, China, Britain, France, India, Israel, or someone else.

To hear some people talk, you would think you need to buy a $2,000,000 former ICBM site to survive a nuclear war. Nope, you don't even need to buy the $260,000 site.

You do need to get a copy of Nuclear War Survival Skills. The book is available for free as a PDF; additionally, you can view the book online.

There is this thing called electromagnetic pulse (EMP); it can fry computers and other electronics, so you might need to buy a hardcopy of the book from Amazon.com or the folks in the links.

If you have more money, and you don't want to move; you can buy a shelter. There are two types of nuclear war shelters, a blast shelter and a fallout shelter.

A blast shelter can be a fallout shelter, but a fallout shelter can't be a blast shelter. This has to do with the effects of a nuclear weapon. The fallout will travel farther than the blast. So, if you are in the blast radius, a fallout shelter will not protect you from over-pressurization effects. Read Nuclear War Survival Skills.

Radius produces fiberglass blast shelters. Safe Castle builds square/rectangle steel blast shelters. Utah Shelter Systems builds round steel blast shelters. All three are expensive.

An alternative is to build your own shelter. There are many plans on the internet. A website from Rad Shelters For You has a round up of the various nuclear war shelters.

A mini blast/fallout shelter can be manufactured locally if you are on a tight budget, and you want to prepare for a nuclear war. As you can see the topic of shelters is a long and varied one. You need to think about what you are going to do and practice those techniques you have decided to use.

So study the links, and I'll ...

See you next week!

Links:

FEMA Hazards Index:

FEMA for Kids:

Equipped To Survive - Tarp Shelters - An Introduction: http://www.equipped.org/tarp-shelters.htm


M4040's - Survival Shelter Building Skills http://www.m4040.com/Survival/Skills/Shelter/Shelter.htm



Outdoor Action "Guide to Snow Shelters" http://www.princeton.edu/~oa/winter/wintshel.shtml



$100 Cabin:



Former Missile bases for sale


Nuclear War Survival Skills, To Read Online http://www.oism.org/nwss

Nuclear War Survival Skills, To Buy: http://www.oism.org/nwss/s73p908.htm

Radius Engineering International:





The Name Says It All! http://www.blastshelter.com/



Original: http://gsiep.blogspot.com/2009/03/week-two-shelter.html

The Generator is a Tool of Freedom


The electric generator is, like the rifle, a tool of freedom. Although it is certainly possible to live with no or minimal electric power (as I have done on a few occasions), no one can deny that electricity makes life easier in so many different ways. The problem with electricity is that, for most people, it is supplied by a public utility company, most if not all of which are government subsidized.

Aside from the governmental aspect, one becomes reliant upon a large infrastructure which can fail for various lengths of time and various natural or man-made reasons. Also, continuation of services depends upon a steady, monthly supply of the legal tender; which brings us to the governmental aspect. Not only is every one of those kilowatt-hours going to be taxed, the legal tender one uses to pay for the service will be taxed at least once before you can use it to pay for anything.

Connecting to the system in the first place will be controlled, too. Your electrical system will have to be installed by a licensed electrician, then inspected by the government. All this, of course, costs you more money. The chances are good that, before you will be allowed an electrical connection, you will have to have a public water connection, if such is available in your area. Almost certainly, you will be required to have a licensed and inspected septic system. More money, more inspections and permits, more taxes.

In a lot of jurisdictions, trash pickup will then be required as well. In most of my experiences with public utilities, the fee (and taxes, of course) for trash pickup have been automatically assessed as part of the utility bill, whether the service was actually used or not; and there was no provision for opting-out.

In some jurisdictions as well, there is a driveway connection fee that is automatically assessed, that may be possibly bypassed if one never initiates the process of applying for public utilities. The utility department seems to be the “horse” that all these other, not necessarily wanted, services ride in on, along with their attendant fees. If your jurisdiction is relatively free from all these added “gotchas”, don't be so smug; as they could start adding those things at any time, and if you are already connected, it will be very difficult to disconnect. In fact, it probably won't be allowed. Part of the “social contract”, you understand.
That utility company is a convenient handle to grab you by, and once they have a grip, they don't let go easily.

If you move into the backwoods beyond the powerlines, say to get away from the encroachment of civilization, you are going to be charged for extending the powerlines. This can and probably will run to many thousands of dollars, after which you will be subjected to all of the above mentioned problems, perhaps with even a higher charge for your service than if you had moved closer to town like “normal” people. What are you gonna do after paying twenty thousand bucks for the extension; refuse to pay the surcharge? And now you will probably see that encroachment of the masses you were hoping to avoid, who were only staying away because they didn't want to pay for the powerline; and now you have taken care of that obstacle. They probably won't even thank you, they will just start complaining about your chickens and your ugly old truck.

So what option do you have? Buy a piece of land in a relatively unrestricted area; an area that doesn't require building permits. Build something, find an unlicensed local handyman to build it for you, or drag a trailer or something out there. Build an outhouse, a composting toilet, or dig your own septic tank, or hire the aforementioned handyman to help you. If you can't find a local unlicensed handyman for whatever reason, take a drive through the parking lot of the nearest Lowes or Home Depot; it is a near-certainty that you will find some guys there who are willing to help. Get there early, though.

For water, you can rent or buy a drilling machine, or drive a well, or buy a tank or build a cistern and build a rainwater catchment system, or just haul your water. Or maybe a combination of two or more of the above.

Now, you are ready for electrical power. Time to get that generator. You will probably want to get a battery bank and inverter so you still have power for lighting, refrigeration, entertainment etc. without having to run the genny all the time. You will probably also want to eventually add solar panels and/or a wind generator or whatever, to extend the time you can operate without running the genny. That way, you can run the genny just one to three times per week, 8-12 hours each time, to top off the batteries and operate your heavy loads. Or if you need air conditioning, you can run the genny for a few hours each day, and size your battery bank and inverter to power a small air conditioner overnight in your sleeping area.

But you can make it for awhile with just the generator, if you don't have money for all that other stuff right off the bat. You want to get a good one, though; preferably diesel and definitely 1800 rpm or less. No 3600 rpm screamers here. Although the new ones can be incredibly fuel efficient and quiet, they just don't last long under continuous use. Also, they are too easy to steal. The kind of generator you want will weigh a minimum of 800 pounds, maybe double or triple that. It will be fuel efficient and able to run days, weeks or months continuously if necessary at near-maximum loads. Not that you will be running it like that, but knowing that it is designed to handle it gives you peace of mind to go to sleep, leaving it running overnight if necessary. There will probably be times that it will be beneficial to do that.

Of course, the generator will need fuel, but that doesn't necessarily mean you have to leave the homestead and take a job to pay for that fuel. If your homestead isn't producing much legal tender, you can still produce methane gas or producer gas (woodgas) to run a spark-ignition engine; and with a diesel engine you can either grow oil-producing plants or find a restaurant or two that will give you their used cooking oil. With some diesels, you can even supplement the oil with methane gas or producer gas injected into the intake air stream, which will reduce the amount of fuel oil used.

If you play your cards just right, the “Matrix” may never even notice you are there, thanks in part to your generator.



Original: http://alabamapreppersnetwork.blogspot.com/2009/03/generator-is-tool-of-freedom.html