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Monday, January 12, 2009

Looking for Survival Files and E-Books?

I've added a new link on the left to my Survival FTP.
Hundreds of files from canning to wildcraft and more.

Enjoy!

Product of the Day

Gerber Clutch

I have one of these on me at all times. Inexpensive, well-made and a good back-up to your main multi-tool.

Technical Details

  • Components: Needlenose pliers, knife blade, file, nail cleaner, small and medium flat blade screwdrivers, crosspoint screwdriver, tweezers, bottle opener and key ring attachment.
  • Strong mini-pliers
  • Keychain compatible
  • Lightweight, anodized aluminum handles
  • Handle Color: Red Tail Hawk

Product Description

From the Manufacturer
The Clutch could well be the perfect little tool when you find yourself in something of a clutch. (You know it's gonna happen.) It measures just 2.5" in length when closed. Yet when you access the outboard tools, you're rewarded with a tidy little collection of screwdrivers bottle opener, gritty file and an all-purpose knife blade. So go ahead. Clip it into your keychain. Slip it in your pocket. Keep it in the glovebox. Because you just never know when there'll be a big need for these little pliers.



Heating with Wood

There you go scratching your head, trying to figure out how you are going to stay warm during the cold winter months after the Saudi's import sanctions against the U.S., preferring to sell their oil to China. After all the Chinese produce over ten percent of the world’s consumer goods and they are ready, willing and able to sell or trade military secrets and technology to countries hostel toward the America.

There is no easy answer, at least long term. I think the problem will be more a lack of funds rather then of supply. Those holding the wealth will control whatever resources left. As usual the poor will be hit hardest, while the rich will continue on as usual, at least until actual Peak Oil happens and the oil flow decreases to a dribble.

The availability of wood for heating will depend on your location more then anything else. Someone hidden away in the deserts of Nevada would have a harder time heating with wood then the hermit secluded in the hills of Tennessee.

Only a few years ago just about everyone in my area heated with wood, now only a small number own a wood stove. It seems the ease of natural gas drove the final nail in the coffin of the wood burner.

I can heat my trailer all winter with three pickup loads of wood or less depending on how cold it gets and how long the cold snaps last. In the south our winters are fairly mild, rarely falling below twenty degrees, up north it may get minus twenty or lower requiring much more wood to stay warm.

Post Peak Oil, cutting the wood and getting it from woodlot to woodpile may present the most difficult challenge for the survivor, rather then a lack of supply. A crosscut saw and an ax would be worth there weight in gold after the chainsaw sucks the last drop of fuel from the tank.

Sleeping bags rated at -10 or better, thermal socks and underwear are a must for colder parts of the country. I can remember as a child of maybe eight or ten, my mother lost her job and we were forced to stay in an old abandoned barn. I recall waking to a bed full of snow that had blown in through the cracks in the walls. We survived only because we had those sleeping bags and thermal socks and underwear.

Do everything you can to make your dwelling more energy efficient. Plastic over the windows, blankets hung over the doors, skirting around trailers etc,. Little things can make a big difference, saving a lot of resources making your supplies last much longer then normal.

Wood heat may not be the perfect solution against the cold but it maybe the best option available for most of us at the moment. It sure beats propane post peak-oil or dying of CO poisoning while trying to feed a Sierra Stove with bags of wood pellets.

There is always questions the trick is finding the answers. Keep Surviving.

Original: http://thesurvivalistblog.blogspot.com/2008/12/heating-with-wood.html

22 or pellet?

I just mentioned pellet guns a few issues ago. I was envisioning children’s or introductory, inexpensive rifles to deal with pests. Primary given to children to learn marksmanship and stalking skills. Of course then you run into the problem about quality. A cheap rifle will not last forever and the further into a collapse scenario the more importance you must place in your grain storage and the eradication of rodents. A reader generously gave me research material and I looked a bit online to get more information. And, once again, we are confronted with the same problem as most of frugal preparedness equipment. We can’t afford the quality so we compromise and buy cheaper items. Then we have to worry about their failure. But if we try to buy all quality we end up not getting enough of the needed supplies.
*
A quality pellet rifle is in the $200 to $500 range for a spring piston type. RWS-Diana is recommended. But that is more than I would spend on either a surplus bolt action thirty caliber rifle or a brand new rimfire. One solution is that if you have a good .22 just buy ammo that about matches pellet performance. If you use .22 CB longs you get very little noise, even quieter than some pellet guns. But to work the barrel needs to be 22 inches or longer. You get about an inch group at fifty yards. Unfortunately the rounds are twice the cost of .22LR. But if quiet will save your life… Or you could just build a silencer after the ATF is reduced to atomic rubble.
*
The thing I dislike about the pellet guns is that ( besides the price of the gun itself ) the ammunition is less than half the cost of .22 rimfire. 1000 pellets cost $12. You can buy 1100 .22’s for twenty bucks with tax included at Wal-Mart. And the guns cost at least twice as much. I can’t see much advantage in the pellet gun except noise reduction. The range is about the same. Don’t use the .22 pellets. They are less accurate and are poorer at penetration than the .177 pellets. They are good to 40 yards compared to 65 for the .177. A rimfire .22 is good to about 100 but that usually means you need a scope. So an unscoped .22 rimfire is about as good on range as a scoped pellet gun. Something to consider if you worry about scopes breaking or failing with no replacement possible.
*
If you do go with a pellet gun, and if it is a spring piston you should buy three replacement parts. A mainspring, a breech seal and a piston seal. Then your gun should last just about forever. If it is a quality gun it will last generations. Just don’t forget a repair manual. And I would think eventually, unless you have good money to really stockpile ammo, you are going to run out of pellets. I wonder if you can buy a mold? For the price, however, you could have a lot of .22 rimfire ammo. If your pellet gun cost $300 and you bought 20,000 pellets you would have spent about $550. If you bought a Marlin $99 .22 rimfire rifle ( tube fed to save on mags ) and 20,000 rounds of .22LR you would have spent fifty bucks less. Which brings us to a very good point.
*
If you own a rimfire, you can kill a man easily with a hit properly placed. If you own a pellet gun you will either need to sneek up on the guy sleeping or just get really, really lucky. It will be a fluke if it happens. A rimfire will not kill them right away, so retaliation is a factor. I grant you that. But if you must defend yourself a .22LR just might do the trick whereas a pellet won’t 99 times out of a hundred. With a rimfire you can hunt below its capacity. Rodents or small game. Yes, it will destroy flesh and scare away the others unless you have a silencer. A pellet gun is suited ideally for pest control. But it will not defend you. It is like sending a .223 or a 7.62x39 to do the job of a .308 or .303 or 8mm.
*
Given the high ammo cost and high gun cost I can’t recommend a pellet gun unless you are concerned past about twenty or thirty years ( or even fifty ) after your ammo starts to fail for a rimfire. The only advantages to a pellet gun are lack of noise and indestructible ammunition. But you will pay a high price for it. So what about a cheaper alternative? How about the $30 multi-pump at Wal-Mart. BB’s cost a lot less than pellets. 6,000 for about ten bucks. Not as good as a pellet and the gun is half the power. But it is one tenth the price. For pest control only, it might suffice. For small game hunting rely on your rimfire.
*
If you do still want to go with a pellet gun of quality, not saying you shouldn’t just that it is pricey, go to http://www.amazon.com/ for the less expensive ones. I didn’t even look too hard and found one at $100. If nothing else you can read all the reviews, which are priceless. I bought hundreds of dollars of books from them and the reviews helped me decide which ones to get and which ones to avoid ( for the most part, enough to be a general rule of thumb ).

Original: http://bisonsurvivalblog.blogspot.com/2006/12/blog-post.html

alternate power

THE 15 WATT POWER SYSTEM
It’s hard for most of us to escape the Petroleum Age. Even those of us that heat exclusively with wood still have gas driven chain saws. And more than likely drive to the wood source. Unless you own the woods you are cutting from and stock plenty of gas with stabilizer added you will soon be out of wood if petroleum supplies are cut off. And most folks cook with propane if they are off the grid. All of these things are great to avoid short term power disruptions but do little to address long term shortages. And since a lot of folks use generators for charging their batteries, that too is liable to face fuel problems.
*
Don’t get me wrong. Wood heat and propane cooking and diesel generators are a wonderful thing to have. Much better than living in the city subject to power outages, either due to terror attacks or system failure due to overload or lack of maintenance to satisfy stockholders. But you also need to have some kind of solar back-up. Solar will not fit every situation. Yellowstone blowing or an asteroid strike or World War Three erupting after Israel bombs suspected Iranian nuclear weapons plants will fill the atmosphere with enough crap that both farming and solar power will be put on hold for a few years. But solar has a better chance of supplying you with power than a petroleum generator does. We can only play the odds.
*
Solar power is still expensive. No where near as expensive as decades ago but still it is not too affordable. $6 a watt is about the best deal out there unless you buy a huge system and that is beyond most of our budgets. My solution thus far is to own a $20 solar battery charger. The kind that charges AAA, AA, C and D batteries. Then you use LED flashlights and lanterns. Which are $6 to $10 each. A very cheap solution. But of course it comes at a price. LED lighting is wonderful, as a cheap solution. Nothing comes close to providing the light as cheaply. So I always recommend it for poor folk on a budget trying to prepare. But the light output is marginal. You can read by it, if you hold the book close enough. But don’t try to do much else.
*
For the past five months I lived in the Hippy Bread Van, as most of you know. Cooking was by propane camp stove and lighting was by LED’s. Putting in a fresh set of batteries I would lean the small lantern ( $10, Wal-Mart camping section ) on my upper chest and read reclining on the bed. Good enough for about twenty hours of use until it started to dim. And for playing cards we had to put up two lanterns and two hanging flashlights to see the cards comfortably. LED’s are good for emergency situations or those on a really tight budget. For a much better light you will want a small solar panel and an RV battery and an RV 15w florescent lamp. One will light up your whole 20 foot travel trailer very brightly.
*
The Sportsman’s Guide ( www.sportsmansguide.com ) has a 15 watt solar panel for $99. They also have a regulator and a rack for adding more than one. But let’s focus on the one panel, as we are poor and broke. Of course the 15w is at optimal performance. And it would really suck if this was the only panel you could ever get. But, again, there is a huge difference between what we want, what we need and what we can afford. I might need preventive maintenance health care but it ain’t in the budget. I might want hundreds of watts of solar power, but it is not in the budget. Heck, 15w isn’t even really in the budget which is why I still have my LED setup. But it sure delivers a level of light that is pure heaven compared to LED’s. I just moved into a trailer park after insurmountable problems with the stepdaughter forced us to abandon parking there. I can’t afford that either, but real light and our own bathroom almost make it worth while. If you can squeeze it into your budget at all, go with a solar panel and florescent light. There is a world of difference.
*
For about $100 you can buy several LED’s, several sets of rechargeable batteries and a recharger. If this is all you can afford, fine. It will keep you in light for decades. You can even spend less if you stay with only one battery size. For instance, AA. Buy three LED small lanterns ( they are electronic and will break, have back ups ) and a charger and 12 batteries. Cost is about $65. Two lanterns, one charger and six batteries are $45. And you can buy a little at a time. Buy one lantern and a mess of dollar store disposable batteries. $15. When you can afford it, the charger. Then the batteries. If you are really poor buy a $6 flashlight that uses AAA and buy some disposables. $10 total cost. But you really need a solar charger for long term emergencies. Even if you could barter for more disposables they will most likely be dead years in the future. Disposables are more for the short term preppers. They have little reason to buy solar and are only reading this because I am their new god and they love me.
*
For the panel you need the panel, a regulator and a battery. Figure about $200 if you buy a marine battery at Wal-Mart. More if you don’t. I haven’t priced the florescent fixture or the bulbs. I wouldn’t imagine they would be too much if you shop around. With seven hours of strong sun light a day you can then run your light about six hours. Not bad at all. Better than going to bed at sun set. Of course, with the LED set up you need three hours of sunlight to have the lantern run 20 hours, but as we discussed the light quality is vastly reduced. You are buying quality here. Kind of like when I tell you to buy the Lee-Enfield for $150 rather than the Russian bolt gun for $75. The ammo is twice the price too. It is a vastly better step up the quality ladder. Cheapest is not always best. It will usually do in a pinch. You just might want to always do a little better if possible.
*
So, $100 to do it right for LED’s. $250 for a trailer solar set up. You will need light long term. Your choice. Of course beware the shorter life of 12v batteries. Five years. A set of rechargeable batteries will last ten if they are recharged every other week and only last half of the cycles that is advertised. Potentially they could last over twenty years if you have several sets, if you fully discharge before charging and if a little luck is with you. The trade off is weak light. But the weak light does have one advantage. Unless you stare into the bulb it will not destroy your night vision. Hard to make up your mind, isn’t it? To further muddy the waters, an advantage of the 12v system is that it can be used on things other than lights. Such as a small air pump in a fallout shelter.

Original: http://bisonsurvivalblog.blogspot.com/2006/11/alternate-power.html

HOBO STOVE

Amazon.com is a great resource for the survivalist. They list books well below retail, in some states you avoid the sales tax and if you don’t buy in one’s and two’s they give you free shipping ( a major feat itself in an economy where UPS continuously increases its fuel surcharge ). Of course by listing almost any book ever published by all major or minor book publishers they do offer the occasional bomb. One fiction book I ordered, some darn thing about the New Madrid quake flooding all of the Mid west, had a huge error three quarters of the way through. The last quarter was missing and they repeated an earlier section so you don’t know how things end. A pity, as it was a good book. Another was on clothes washing the old fashion way, about $7 for a padded pamphlet. And mainly just an advertisement for their ( hopefully defunct ) pre-Y2K company selling expensive goods such as the James Washer. No mention was made of cheaper products they didn’t sell. Another clunker was a book on the Hobo Stove. I bought it since it was basically about surviving with this stove. You could probably sell me a Nazi homosexual erotic thriller if you just put the word “survival” in the title.
*
Basically all that the Hobo Stove book said was to build a coffee can stove and use tuna can cardboard/wax for fuel. But it took around thirty or forty pages to do it. Was it worth the nearly ten bucks I paid for it? At the time, maybe. Now, after hearing from readers and seeing other articles on the same thing, perhaps not. One reader even got his tuna can fuel recipe printed in a magazines mail section. And it is a good idea. Take an old tuna can, clean it, remove the paper. Then take cardboard, the kind that has the reinforcing weave in the middle- corrugated. Cut it to the same height as the tuna can. When it goes into the can it should be just under the lip. Wind your strips of cardboard into the can so that you fill the whole thing ( think of a tortilla you roll up and then stand on end but rolled tight so there is nothing left out of the middle ). The open ends of the cardboard should face up.
*
After you fill up your cans, melt some wax. The cheapest is to gather up old candle nubs and re-melt them together. Or buy some big blocks of candle wax. Use a double burner, the bottom pot boiling water, the pot laying on the water holding your wax. When melted take the wax and pour into the cans filled with cardboard. The reason the cardboard is faxing open end up is that the wax pours in between the holes in the cardboard and the cardboard is turned into a giant wick. Since wax is almost always paraffin it is petroleum based and will burn well. This is your fuel tablet. You can use bigger size cans if you desire. Experiment to see that they give the same heat as the smaller tuna can that burns nice and hot.
*
Your stove is basically a coffee can emptied and turned open end down. Poke a few holes in it for some air to get to your fire. If you want to simplify your life poke two holes at the top and put a cloths hanger handle in it to be able to move your hot stove. The once bottom, now top end is now your cooking service. By the time your coffee can rusts away you will have emptied another one. Now you have a free stove/heater and almost free fuel tabs. Your only cost is the wax. The cardboard is from the trash and everyone eats tuna and drinks coffee. The book I was telling you about goes one with recipes and other filler material, but that is it in a nutshell. Make sure you have air coming in if used indoors. A window cracked even a half inch will work. I mostly depend on propane, having lived in trailers most of my adult life and getting a two-fer ( day to day use and good in survival situations ). But this stove is very light weight and smaller than a propane stove. And perhaps the fuel is not cheaper for the BTU per dollar delivered, but the cost saved on the stove will buy a lot of fuel.
*
Do not underestimate the need for hot meals on a winter day, especially if the power goes out. And by using a lot of your used cans you can save on trash ( always good for a hug from a tree-hugger if you can find one that is not a lesbian ) and make bigger fuel tabs that will work in a pinch for heating during a power outage. Get the smallest room you can, light up a can and huddle in a wool blanket. It will keep you from freezing. Pick a cool space to store your fuel to avoid summer time melting and always construct several at a time to minimize your clean up and time spent.
*
I have seen articles calling for only a single ring of cardboard on the inside of the can ( can was soup size ) and the rest filled with wax. I don’t know which is better. You will want to try both kinds. Test for longevity and heat output ( the standard test for stoves is how many minutes it takes to boil a cup of water ). And the amount of wax used. If it takes three times the wax in a single ring stove which only delivers twice the burn time, stick with the cardboard filled. If anyone can, e-mail the results and I will share it with everyone.

oRIGINAL: HOBO STOVE
Amazon.com is a great resource for the survivalist. They list books well below retail, in some states you avoid the sales tax and if you don’t buy in one’s and two’s they give you free shipping ( a major feat itself in an economy where UPS continuously increases its fuel surcharge ). Of course by listing almost any book ever published by all major or minor book publishers they do offer the occasional bomb. One fiction book I ordered, some darn thing about the New Madrid quake flooding all of the Mid west, had a huge error three quarters of the way through. The last quarter was missing and they repeated an earlier section so you don’t know how things end. A pity, as it was a good book. Another was on clothes washing the old fashion way, about $7 for a padded pamphlet. And mainly just an advertisement for their ( hopefully defunct ) pre-Y2K company selling expensive goods such as the James Washer. No mention was made of cheaper products they didn’t sell. Another clunker was a book on the Hobo Stove. I bought it since it was basically about surviving with this stove. You could probably sell me a Nazi homosexual erotic thriller if you just put the word “survival” in the title.
*
Basically all that the Hobo Stove book said was to build a coffee can stove and use tuna can cardboard/wax for fuel. But it took around thirty or forty pages to do it. Was it worth the nearly ten bucks I paid for it? At the time, maybe. Now, after hearing from readers and seeing other articles on the same thing, perhaps not. One reader even got his tuna can fuel recipe printed in a magazines mail section. And it is a good idea. Take an old tuna can, clean it, remove the paper. Then take cardboard, the kind that has the reinforcing weave in the middle- corrugated. Cut it to the same height as the tuna can. When it goes into the can it should be just under the lip. Wind your strips of cardboard into the can so that you fill the whole thing ( think of a tortilla you roll up and then stand on end but rolled tight so there is nothing left out of the middle ). The open ends of the cardboard should face up.
*
After you fill up your cans, melt some wax. The cheapest is to gather up old candle nubs and re-melt them together. Or buy some big blocks of candle wax. Use a double burner, the bottom pot boiling water, the pot laying on the water holding your wax. When melted take the wax and pour into the cans filled with cardboard. The reason the cardboard is faxing open end up is that the wax pours in between the holes in the cardboard and the cardboard is turned into a giant wick. Since wax is almost always paraffin it is petroleum based and will burn well. This is your fuel tablet. You can use bigger size cans if you desire. Experiment to see that they give the same heat as the smaller tuna can that burns nice and hot.
*
Your stove is basically a coffee can emptied and turned open end down. Poke a few holes in it for some air to get to your fire. If you want to simplify your life poke two holes at the top and put a cloths hanger handle in it to be able to move your hot stove. The once bottom, now top end is now your cooking service. By the time your coffee can rusts away you will have emptied another one. Now you have a free stove/heater and almost free fuel tabs. Your only cost is the wax. The cardboard is from the trash and everyone eats tuna and drinks coffee. The book I was telling you about goes one with recipes and other filler material, but that is it in a nutshell. Make sure you have air coming in if used indoors. A window cracked even a half inch will work. I mostly depend on propane, having lived in trailers most of my adult life and getting a two-fer ( day to day use and good in survival situations ). But this stove is very light weight and smaller than a propane stove. And perhaps the fuel is not cheaper for the BTU per dollar delivered, but the cost saved on the stove will buy a lot of fuel.
*
Do not underestimate the need for hot meals on a winter day, especially if the power goes out. And by using a lot of your used cans you can save on trash ( always good for a hug from a tree-hugger if you can find one that is not a lesbian ) and make bigger fuel tabs that will work in a pinch for heating during a power outage. Get the smallest room you can, light up a can and huddle in a wool blanket. It will keep you from freezing. Pick a cool space to store your fuel to avoid summer time melting and always construct several at a time to minimize your clean up and time spent.
*
I have seen articles calling for only a single ring of cardboard on the inside of the can ( can was soup size ) and the rest filled with wax. I don’t know which is better. You will want to try both kinds. Test for longevity and heat output ( the standard test for stoves is how many minutes it takes to boil a cup of water ). And the amount of wax used. If it takes three times the wax in a single ring stove which only delivers twice the burn time, stick with the cardboard filled. If anyone can, e-mail the results and I will share it with everyone.

Original: HOBO STOVE
Amazon.com is a great resource for the survivalist. They list books well below retail, in some states you avoid the sales tax and if you don’t buy in one’s and two’s they give you free shipping ( a major feat itself in an economy where UPS continuously increases its fuel surcharge ). Of course by listing almost any book ever published by all major or minor book publishers they do offer the occasional bomb. One fiction book I ordered, some darn thing about the New Madrid quake flooding all of the Mid west, had a huge error three quarters of the way through. The last quarter was missing and they repeated an earlier section so you don’t know how things end. A pity, as it was a good book. Another was on clothes washing the old fashion way, about $7 for a padded pamphlet. And mainly just an advertisement for their ( hopefully defunct ) pre-Y2K company selling expensive goods such as the James Washer. No mention was made of cheaper products they didn’t sell. Another clunker was a book on the Hobo Stove. I bought it since it was basically about surviving with this stove. You could probably sell me a Nazi homosexual erotic thriller if you just put the word “survival” in the title.
*
Basically all that the Hobo Stove book said was to build a coffee can stove and use tuna can cardboard/wax for fuel. But it took around thirty or forty pages to do it. Was it worth the nearly ten bucks I paid for it? At the time, maybe. Now, after hearing from readers and seeing other articles on the same thing, perhaps not. One reader even got his tuna can fuel recipe printed in a magazines mail section. And it is a good idea. Take an old tuna can, clean it, remove the paper. Then take cardboard, the kind that has the reinforcing weave in the middle- corrugated. Cut it to the same height as the tuna can. When it goes into the can it should be just under the lip. Wind your strips of cardboard into the can so that you fill the whole thing ( think of a tortilla you roll up and then stand on end but rolled tight so there is nothing left out of the middle ). The open ends of the cardboard should face up.
*
After you fill up your cans, melt some wax. The cheapest is to gather up old candle nubs and re-melt them together. Or buy some big blocks of candle wax. Use a double burner, the bottom pot boiling water, the pot laying on the water holding your wax. When melted take the wax and pour into the cans filled with cardboard. The reason the cardboard is faxing open end up is that the wax pours in between the holes in the cardboard and the cardboard is turned into a giant wick. Since wax is almost always paraffin it is petroleum based and will burn well. This is your fuel tablet. You can use bigger size cans if you desire. Experiment to see that they give the same heat as the smaller tuna can that burns nice and hot.
*
Your stove is basically a coffee can emptied and turned open end down. Poke a few holes in it for some air to get to your fire. If you want to simplify your life poke two holes at the top and put a cloths hanger handle in it to be able to move your hot stove. The once bottom, now top end is now your cooking service. By the time your coffee can rusts away you will have emptied another one. Now you have a free stove/heater and almost free fuel tabs. Your only cost is the wax. The cardboard is from the trash and everyone eats tuna and drinks coffee. The book I was telling you about goes one with recipes and other filler material, but that is it in a nutshell. Make sure you have air coming in if used indoors. A window cracked even a half inch will work. I mostly depend on propane, having lived in trailers most of my adult life and getting a two-fer ( day to day use and good in survival situations ). But this stove is very light weight and smaller than a propane stove. And perhaps the fuel is not cheaper for the BTU per dollar delivered, but the cost saved on the stove will buy a lot of fuel.
*
Do not underestimate the need for hot meals on a winter day, especially if the power goes out. And by using a lot of your used cans you can save on trash ( always good for a hug from a tree-hugger if you can find one that is not a lesbian ) and make bigger fuel tabs that will work in a pinch for heating during a power outage. Get the smallest room you can, light up a can and huddle in a wool blanket. It will keep you from freezing. Pick a cool space to store your fuel to avoid summer time melting and always construct several at a time to minimize your clean up and time spent.
*
I have seen articles calling for only a single ring of cardboard on the inside of the can ( can was soup size ) and the rest filled with wax. I don’t know which is better. You will want to try both kinds. Test for longevity and heat output ( the standard test for stoves is how many minutes it takes to boil a cup of water ). And the amount of wax used. If it takes three times the wax in a single ring stove which only delivers twice the burn time, stick with the cardboard filled. If anyone can, e-mail the results and I will share it with everyone.

Original: http://bisonsurvivalblog.blogspot.com/2006/11/hobo-stove.html

Link of the Day

MODERN SURVIVAL MAGAZINE
An online-only publication
FROM EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JIM BENSON, FORMER EDITOR OF
AMERICAN SURVIVAL GUIDE


http://www.modernsurvival.net/

Quote of the Day

Moderation is the secret of survival.
~Manly Hall

Homemade Firestarters


Making homemade firestarters is quite simple and easy. Some may ask: What’s the point of making my own firestarters at home when I can by matches at the store. The answer is simple also. Making homemade firestarters is cost-effective and doing so will increase your knowledge of basic wilderness survival. Homemade firestarters can be made from just about anything in your home. Here are a few examples:

Vaseline Dipped Cotton Balls - Take a few cotton balls (enough to fill up a sandwich bag) and coat them in Vaseline. After you’ve thoroughly coated them in Vaseline, place them into the sandwich bag and seal it up for use later.

Wax Coated Newspaper - Cut or tear your newspaper in strips, and coat them with melted wax. Be careful when using the melted wax because it is very flammable. Be prepared to put out the fire should one start.

Dryer Lint - Yes, that’s right, dryer lint. Dryer lint is pieces of flammable material all balled up together. This is the simplest homemade firestarter there is. You just collected from your dryer and go on your way.

Homemade Wicks - Take a few cotton cords or rope and cut into desired sections. Melt the wax and dip the cords into it. Let dry and store the waxed cords away from heat.

Paper Towel Rolls - Use paper towel rolls to start your campfire. In order to do this you need to stuff it with either paper towels or newspaper. Newspaper works better for kindling the fire.

There are many things you could use to make homemade firestarters. The key is knowing what you CAN use. Almost all paper products can be used to start fires. Newspaper as mentioned above is the best for starting fires. When the recipe calls for paper, newspaper is the recommended product. Wax is another product useful in making firestarters at home. You could either melt your candles to get wax or you could buy a block of wax, particularly paraffin wax, to melt. Regardless of your method of attaining the wax, it will serve as a valuable resource for producing firestarters.

Mostly anything that you wax can be burned also. Anything natural, that is. You could wax old cereal boxes, juice boxes, or rice boxes. Pine cones from a tree covered or dipped in melted wax are great firestarters too! The possibilities are virtually endless. If you have wax and paper, you’ll have a firestarter. So you see making homemade firestarters is a simple task.

Copywrite @12008 Delmarva Survival Training

Original: http://www.survival-training.info/articles/Homemade%20Firestarters.htm

Warm your winter with Canning


By Joseph Parish


I dare say there is no better way to spend weekends than canning local vegetables, peaches, berries or apples. For being a northern state Delaware winters are not really that bad weather wise. Here is the middle of December and our temperatures today were close to seventy degrees. Not bad at all for winter.

I don’t let season dictate to me what I will can or jar. I have found that the supermarket sometimes has very good sales going on even in the middle of winter so I do not hesitate to purchase my produce from the market in the winter.

Although I grew up in a family that canned and “put food away” I really did not appreciate the value of home canning until I got married. My wife and I decided to attempt the process together and it proved to be a lot of fun. That first canning experience was nearly forty years ago. With our family raised and now on their own, we do not really see any necessity for canning however occasionally we will do it just for the fun of it.

Unfortunately I feel canning is on a decline and that is so sad. I know of just about no one who still cans to this day. None of my neighbors can, none of the family can, and it is becoming a dead craft.

I hope to convince you that saving the harvest from the fields be it summer or winter is not only a frugal way to eat but also a lot of fun. We now live in a fast paced over extended society and any time you can find a few moments to relax and enjoy life to its max you should take it.

We had initially stuck to the basic types of canning such as pickles or strawberry jams. You would be surprised at the number of different cucumber type pickles or relishes there are. Take a quick glance at a Bell Canning Book and you will become a believer. As we progressed in our canning, we got braver and attempted many different types of canning such as bread or chicken.

There are two basic types of canning – those with a pressure cooker and those with a water bath. I prefer the water bath as it is a simpler method and you can readily see you results.

Always follow the recipes although it is possible to modify them to a certain degree. Why not, this will add that personal touch to each recipe and can of finished produce. Essentially, you begin by cooking your selected jelly, salsas or pickles on top of your kitchen stove according to the recipe you are following. Ladle your cooked product into clean, sterilized jars and place the jars into the boiling water bath for a predetermined period. This time depends upon the recipe you have selected.

You can begin by sterilizing your jars and lids in the dishwasher and then again place them in a hot water bath prior to being filled. You may safely reuse the rings but I do not recommend reusing the lids.

Do not fill the jars too close to the top. Leave about one half-inch headroom between the food and the top of the jar for expansion, etc. Make certain to clean off any of the spilled food on the sides of the jar before screwing the lid on it.

If all this sounds like it would be of interest to you visit your local library and pick up addition titles relating to food canning and preservation. You will find the process a fun and interesting challenge. I have enclosed a simple Peach jam recipe to get you going.

Peach Jam

8 med peaches or 6 cups, cut into wedges (Canned Peaches can be used)
1 small unpeeled navel orange cut into wedges
2 8 oz cans of crushed pineapple, undrained
12 maraschino cherries
3 T. maraschino cherry juice
2 packages powdered fruit pectin
10 cups of sugar

In your blender, process the fruits and juice in several batches until they are smooth. Transfer them to a large kettle, stir in the pectin and bring the mixture to a rapid boil stirring frequently. Add the 10 cups of sugar and return the mixture to a rolling boil. Continue the boil for 2 minutes making sure to stir constantly. Remove the contents from the heat and skim off the foam. Lastly pour into sterilized jars. This batch makes 12 half-pints.

Original: http://www.survival-training.info/articles/Warm%20your%20winter%20with%20Canning.htm

Cell Phone Numbers for the New Year

If you are considering resolutions to make for the New Year, permit me to add one to your list - add the following list of phone numbers to your cell phone address book.

Poison Control: 1-800-222-1222. Of course call 9-1-1 for serious poisoning but suppose you just want to ask a question, "Johnny ate some fire ants, will he get sick?"

[Urban Myth? A parent calls poison control about his child eating ants. Will he get sick? The answer is no. That's great news, says the parent, but just to be sure I fed my child some ant poison to kill the ants. Poison Control, responds, NOW we have an emergency...]

ICE (In Case of Emergency) - first responders are now asked to check a cell phone for an entry called "ICE". It represents the person you want called in case you are incapacitated (or dead).

Your Car Insurance Company - if you have an auto accident, call your insurer to find out what information you must collect and what actions you must take.

Police Dept - for a simple accident with no need for an ambulance, call the police directly instead of using 9-1-1.
Tow Truck Company or AAA - who you gonna call if your car breaks down? (NOT 9-1-1)

Local Taxi Company - when the tow truck drives off with your broken down car, how will you get home?

Your Boss - (continuing the auto accident theme) you'll want to call the office and let them know you'll be late.

Your Next Door Neighbor - due to an accident or bad weather, perhaps you won't make it home tonight. Will your neighbor feed your cat?

Your personal Doctor - your neck is sore after that car accident, better schedule an appointment.

Power Company - you don't want to look up their number in the dark when you lose power do you?

Favorite Take Out or Delivery Food - there are times I'm driving home and think, if only I knew the number of my favorite pizza place. I could order now and pick it up on the way home.

Bottom Line

Dial 9-1-1 when there is a medical, fire or police emergency, such as

• Life or lives are in danger
• A fire
• Serious injury
• Serious medical condition
• A serious crime in progress

9-1-1 is so convenient that Americans now call it for everything - directions when lost, to ask questions, etc. But this is WRONG. 9-1-1 is for serious emergencies only:

• Life or lives are in danger
• A fire
• Serious injury
• Serious medical condition
• A serious crime in progress

For all other situations use the phone numbers listed above and now stored in your cell phone!

Original at: http://perpetualpreparedness.blogspot.com/2008/12/cell-phone-numbers-for-new-year.html