In my opinion, these are the best of the best of survival and preparedness articles gleaned from the 'net.

Please visit the originating sites to see more like them.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Wearing a Trauma Ready Belt

Original Article

by Travis
I recently attended a conference with speakers who served in EMS and incident command at the Boston Marathon bombing. They gave inspiring speeches about crisis leadership, but something they said got me thinking… They stated that many people used expedient materials to form tourniquets to stop massive hemorrhages from the blast injuries. Many of us, especially men, wear the perfect tourniquet every day… our belts. The problem? You cannot secure most belts down to the diameter of the average sized arm or leg because there aren’t holes that close to the buckle.
Considering the increasing frequency of active shooter situations, it would almost seem our duty as preppers to be ready to respond to these types of situations. One easy way is to make sure that you are wearing a “trauma ready” belt that has extra holes drilled closer to the buckle. See the image below to see where you should drill an extra 10 or so holes to ensure that you can secure your belt firmly around an arm or leg to stop severe bleeding.
Trauma Ready Belt

Friday, April 18, 2014

Stockpile These Foods

Original Article

by Code Name Insight
When it comes to stockpiling food for an emergency, you want to make sure that you get the best bang for your buck when it comes to purchasing this food.  Here's where you want to put your money in order to reap the most nutrients:

Top 10 foods with the most protein

    end-of-tuna
  1. Meat (beef, pork, chicken, etc)
  2. Fish (tuna, salmon, etc)
  3. Cheese
  4. Tofu
  5. Beans
  6. Eggs
  7. Dairy (milk, yogurt)
  8. Nuts (almonds, peanuts, etc)
  9. Seeds (pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, etc)
  10. Spirulina

Top 10 foods with the most fat

  1. Animal fat (beef tallow, lard, etc)
  2. Fish oil (cod liver oil, herring oil, etc)
  3. Oil (olive, corn, peanut, etc)
  4. Butter/margarine
  5. Cheese
  6. Nuts/nut butter
  7. Fatty fish
  8. Dark chocolate
  9. Dried coconut
  10. Avacado

Top 10 foods with the most carbohydrates

  1. Sugar
  2. Grains and cereals (rice, oats, etc)
  3. Dried fruit
  4. Crackers, potato chips
  5. Flour (cakes, cookies, bread, etc)
  6. Jams and jellies
  7. Potatoes
  8. Soda
  9. Pasta
  10. Starchy fruit and vegetables (bananas, apples, etc)
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Monday, April 14, 2014

27+ Ways to Use Dandelion

Original Article

by Angela
Hold off on the weed spray! Make dandelions your friends with these 27+ ways to use them!

Hold off on the weed spray!  That shining yellow flower that pops up all over creation in the spring doesn’t need to be eradicated.  Although dandelions are typically thought of as a pesky weed, they are entirely edible from root to bloom and have many other uses as well.  So if your world is being overrun by dandelions, check out some of these fantastic ways to put them to use for you!

Using Dandelion Roots:

How to Cook Dandelion Roots
Harvesting and Using Dandelion Roots
Dandelion Root Coffee Substitute
Dandelion Root Tea

Using Dandelion Leaves:

Put them in a fresh salad
Cook them like spinach
Try this Wilted Dandelion Salad
Use them in this Avocado Herb Sandwich
10 Ways to Use Dandelion Greens (includes a recipe for pesto!)
Another version of Dandelion Pesto
Juice them
Make a green smoothie
Dandelion leaf tea

Using Dandelion Flowers:

How to make Dandelion Wine and Dandelion Cookies
Another recipe for Dandelion Wine
Dandelion Jelly
Dandelion Syrup
Dandelion Bread
Dandelion Flower Cookies
Dandelion Flower Tea
Iced Lime and Dandelion Tea

Medicinal and personal care uses:

Dandelion Salve
Dandelion Oil for Arthritis and Joint Pain Relief
Dandelion Tonic for liver, bladder, and gallbladder cleansing (video)

Dandelion Recipes:

A roundup of Dandelion Recipes Includes recipes for Cream of Dandelion Soup, Dandelion Egg Salad, Split Pea Dandelion Bud Soup, and more.
Get cooking with dandelions with the Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook!
And if you don’t want to eat the dandelions, you can always use them to Feed your chickens!
More information on using dandelions in these articles:
Dandelions: The Weed You Need
10 Wild Plants You Can Eat
Who knew there were so many fantastic ways to use dandelions?  So when those beautiful yellow flowers pop up this spring, try some of these uses and make dandelions a friend instead of a foe!
The post 27+ Ways to Use Dandelion appeared first on Food Storage and Survival.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Growing Green Onions 8 to 9 Times Faster

Original Article

by Travis
Growing food fast is key to survival in any SHTF scenario. While growing most vegetables from seed takes anywhere from 50 to 125 days, re-growing certain vegetables from left over stems can take significantly less time in a very basic hydroponics system. Green onions are one of the easiest vegetables to re-grow in water. However, there is a little more to it than what most “Suzy homemaker” blogs claim. I have found that green onions will re-grow in a glass of water very quickly and successfully by adding just 2-3 drops of all-purpose plant food with each change of water, which should be done at least every other day. This addition of nutrient will help the onions grow fast and healthy. Without this addition, the onions simply won’t prosper because most drinking water if all but void of nutrients needed for plants to grow. However, it’s important to note that too much of a good thing can also be bad, so don’t add more than 2-3 drops of plant food or you will kill your onion.
So how quickly will they re-grow? I have found that it takes about two weeks to re-grow a green onion from the stem of one previously used. All you have to do is save the root and about 1-2 inches of the stem. Place the root and stem in a tall glass with the nutrient dense water coming about ¼ inch from the top of the stem.  Soon you will have a new set of healthy, nutrient rich onions to eat! Best of all, these stems can be used over and over again as long as you maintain the water and don’t allow any mold to build up on the plant.
Green Onion Hydroponics

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Q and A: what to grow in a shady area and storing canned goods with rings on them

Original Article

Under Pressure
by Jackie Clay
What to grow in a shady area
Our homestead is very small, and in a biggish city, Youngstown, OH. We bought a fixer-upper here about a year ago. The back yard is very small, and it’s on a hillside. Our back and side yard blends into a large park here, Mill Creek Park. I don’t mean a manicured garden park, I mean small lakes, at least one waterfall, wild critters, etc. It’s beautiful! But, while our yard is cleared of most trees, huge, towering maple trees, lots of them, are right on the boundary. So it’s a pretty darn shady hillside a large part of the day. It’s on the north side of the house.

Personally, I think we could grow some herbs there, since I have better luck with partial shade than full sun, which seems to burn my herbs up. I think green would grow well there. But what about fruit trees and bushes? When I was young, I found elderberries, raspberries, etc, in the woods, and on the edges of forest and meadow. So I am going to research what I might plant there, since fruit, in and out of season, is very expensive (to me).

Sorry I am so long-winded. I see in some catalogs trees that are grafted with a few different kinds of one fruit, such as apples, or even with 6 different fruits, like apple, pear, nectarine, etc. Do you know anything about this kind of tree? Are they a good idea? This would be fruit for the table, since I expect that I wouldn’t get a canning amount of any one of the fruits. Do they produce enough to be worth the space? Are they a hardy, long bearing kind of tree?

Barb Mundorff
Youngstown, Ohio
Yes, your herbs should work in your partially-shaded yard. Many other garden plants from salad greens to even green beans and tomatoes will often work. Yes, some fruits, too, will grow in partial shade. In Michigan I had a pie cherry that grew in the dense shade of a huge weeping willow in the front yard. It produced very well, too! Elderberries, plums, paw paws, and persimmons also grow quite well in shady areas.
The “fruit salad” grafted fruit trees can work well for many urban homesteaders. All varieties on the tree don’t ripen at the same time so these trees are quite useful. And you will get enough to can jelly, jams, preserves, or sauce (depending on the fruits!). They do eventually produce well and are as hardy and long-bearing as any other kind of fruit tree meant for your zone. They prefer a more sunny yard but I sure would give it a try. It’s amazing at how many things folks have told me I “couldn’t possibly grow” did very well, indeed. Homesteaders are an experimenting bunch! — Jackie
Storing canned goods with rings on them
I have been canning for about a year now, careful to follow all of your instructions, and those in the Ball Blue Book. Once I am sure my jars are sealed properly I have re-attached the ring to some of them as a sort of insurance & a way to “store” the number of rings I am collecting. I have recently read that this can be dangerous – that should a jar unseal the ring will hold it on and allow bacteria to grow and re-seal the jar. Is this cause for alarm? Do I have to discard any jars I have with rings on them?
Judith Almand
Brandon, Florida
Jars that have become unsealed will NOT reseal if you screw the ring back on a jar lightly. Once unsealed, a jar remains unsealed. As always, when opening a jar, first look at the contents, open the jar, being sure it IS sealed, smell the contents, then bring to boiling temperature for 10-15 minutes. Sometimes a “bad” jar will pop “sealed” and “unsealed” several times but when you open the jar, the lid comes off very easily and you can sure tell it isn’t normal. I frequently store my washed jars that I’ve taken the rings off and washed both then dried, with the clean rings back on, lightly, just to store them without clutter. — Jackie
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